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Local News

  • Chesser combats blindness, becomes Coca-Cola Scholar

    One Washington County woman is not letting blindness get in the way of achieving her dreams.

    Deanna Chesser, 47, is legally blind, and she was recently named Kentucky’s Coca-Cola New Century Scholar.

    When she found out she received the scholarship, she said “it was overwhelming.”

    “You have to be nominated by your college,” Chesser said.

  • Hot cars are a danger to people and pets

    As summer inches ever closer, temperatures are on the rise. As hot as it gets outside in the summer months, one place in particular can become dangerously unbearable: your car.

    That’s because when the sun heats the air inside a vehicle, it has nowhere to go, creating a “greenhouse effect.” In just 10 minutes, the interior of any vehicle can reach temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and even on less hot days it can increase by as much as 40 degrees.

  • County unemployment rate in top 15

    Washington County has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the commonwealth.

    According to the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training, the county sits in the top 15 lowest rates in Kentucky, joining Allen, Boone, Campbell, Henry, and Monroe counties at 3.9 percent.

    Woodford County has the lowest unemployment rate in the state with 3.1 percent.

    Springfield Washington County Economic Development Authority Director Daniel Carney said the low percentage rate can be attributed to expansion projects undertaken by local industries.

  • SCC receiver to remove names form buildings

    The names, plaques, and pictures of those who donated to St. Catharine College can be removed from the walls of the buildings they adorn.  Many people donated to St. Catharine College over the years and were recognized with plaques, bricks, photographs and other means.  U.S. District Judge David J. Hale authorized the court-appointed receiver, L.S. Associates, LLC, to “abandon” the items to anyone requesting the items who are or who are “related to the individual person whose name and/or likeness is depicted ..” on the items.

  • Blue, Brews and BBQ is this weekend

    Anyone that enjoys good blues music, great beer and tasty barbeque will have access to all three this weekend in Springfield. That’s when the second annual Blues, Brews & BBQ festival will be held downtown. Stephanie McMillin, executive director of the Springfield Tourism Commission, said the event would follow the 2017 Bourbon Ride, a charity motorcycle ride visiting the nearby distilleries around Washington County.

  • Silverton Hill horse to run in Belmont Stakes Saturday

    Horse racing season is in full swing, and when the 149th Belmont Stakes is run this Saturday, a horse from Springfield’s Silverton Hill Farm will be in the field.

     

    Meantime, a horse owned by Bonnie and Tommy Hamilton, will be the first horse from the local farm to run in the third jewel of horse racing’s Triple Crown.

     

  • DYW is Saturday

    Washington County’s Distinguished Young Woman has been providing local girls with scholarships for years, and it’s scheduled to take place again this weekend. 

     

    Eleven young ladies will compete during this year’s event, which will be hosted at the new elementary school gym on June 10 at 7 p.m. Distinguished Young Woman allows girls to showcase their skills in physical fitness, scholastics, interviews, self-expression and talents.

     

  • CKCT could see changes in the near future

    Central Kentucky Community Theatre’s artistic director, Eric Seale, is hoping the Springfield Opera House will be getting a makeover soon.  

    According to Seale, plans are in the works for the theatre to make a 90-degree turn to the right, which will give the stage a lot more depth, a little less width, and better lighting all around.

    It’s an idea he said he had from the moment he laid eyes on it.

    “The very first thing I thought when I walked in was; turn it – I mean it was just an instant thought.”

  • Fiscal court discusses water line easements

    Washington County Fiscal Court has formed a committee in order to consider creating a comprehensive permitting process which would allow citizens to tap into a waterline on county land.
    Tim Hall approached the court about creating an encroachment permit process for him, along with anyone else in the county, to use county right of ways in order to install private water lines.

    “This would be setting precedent that we do not have at this point,” Judge-Executive John Settles told the court.

  • District receives grant to form skills center

    Washington County School District isn’t just thinking outside of the box, it’s rebuilding it.

    According to Cherry Boyles, chief academic officer of Washington County Schools, the local school district recently received a $763,000 grant from the commonwealth to invest in its existing infrastructure and create work skills programs at the old elementary school.