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Local News

  • State of emergency declared locally

    Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles announced Tuesday that a state of emergency has been declared in the county, and Gov. Steve Beshear has requested federal assistance to help the county recover from the past weekend's storms. Settles said it is crucial that citizens take photos of any damage, save all repair receipts, and report all damage to homes and businesses to Washington County Emergency Management Director Kevin Devine at (859) 481-3919. This information will be used to help officials get all eligible assistance for which the county qualifies.

  • Weekend flooding soaks county

    The storms that rolled into Washington County Saturday morning finally started to roll out Sunday night. Before the clouds began to clear, many people had been sent in search of higher, dryer ground.

    Washington County Emergency Management Director Kevin Devine said Monday that about 10-12 families were displaced from the flooding, but there were no injuries reported.

    “Everybody is OK, but there is a lot of cleaning up to be done for them to get back in their homes,” he said.

  • City weighs recyclable paper pick-up

    As a famous fictional frog once said, “It’s not easy being green.” That is also the case when there is a possibility to expand curbside recycling in Springfield to include paper products. But while Washington County Solid Waste Coordinator George Ann Palmer would like to include the city in the program, concerns about the lack of available inmate labor and other associated costs have city officials asking more questions.

  • Safety-first thinking closes schools

    The flooding that resulted from the weekend’s heavy rain has taken its toll on the Washington County School System, forcing classes to be closed Monday.

    That day, according to Washington County Superintendent Robin Cochran, is not expected to add a day to the school year. Cochran said Monday that  she hopes the Kentucky Department of Education will approve the use of some emergency time allotted to the school system for such conditions.

  • Bible reading marathon starts May 2

    The annual Bible reading marathon will take place May 2-6 in downtown Springfield. The event will kick off at 5 p.m. at the Washington County Courthouse, and the reading will begin at 6 p.m.

    From the kickoff, someone will stand on the courthouse steps and read from the Bible around the clock through noon on Thursday, May 6, which is the National Day of Prayer. At the close of the event at noon, a special prayer service will be held for the community, the nation and the world.

  • Treasure Hunter's Roadshow buyers visit Springfield

    If you are like most folks, you probably have an attic or basement full of old things you haven’t looked at in years, and most of it is likely to be junk. Then again, there might just be some treasures in there.

  • City looks at options for old swimming pool

    Who wants to buy a pool? That’s the question the Springfield City Council was asking at its meeting on April 13. The council heard from City Attorney Bill Robinson concerning several options for the property, and the council also voted to solicit proposals from interested parties as to what they would do with the property.

    “We’re just requesting ideas that people may have for that property,” said Robinson. “That way we can weigh in and explore those options in terms of whether or not someone wants to buy it, lease it or exchange it.”

  • Show your pride for county's state fair booth

    OK, Washington Countians, what makes you proud about your community? That’s what members of the Springfield Tourism Commission, Springfield-Washington County Chamber of Commerce and Jill Settles with Community Education with the Washington County Board of Education want to know. Plans are under way to give a fresh look to the county’s booth at the “Pride of the Counties” exhibit at the Kentucky State Fair, and your help is requested.

  • Hardin faces Keene for jailer seat in primary

    Washington County Jailer Steve Hardin is ready to run the election gauntlet. Not only does the Democratic incumbent face a challenge by Republican candidate Terry Warner, but first he has to square off with fellow Democrat Felix Keene in the May 18 primary to see who advances to the Nov. 2 general election. With 21 years of experience, 11 as deputy jailer and 10 as jailer, Hardin is counting on his track record to deliver the vote.

  • Dogs raise concerns for county residents

    The county’s animal control officer, Pat Spalding, has received several complaints about dogs running loose. Sheriff Tommy Bartley said there’s a particular problem with loose dogs in the East Texas area.

    “Things were slow from March 22 through April 20,” Spalding told the Washington County Fiscal Court on Friday. “I only took five dogs to Lebanon, and I had five complaints.”

    Among those five complaints was one of a woman who is allegedly using her property as a rescue center.