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Today's News

  • Walk on Washington enters third year

     

    Walk on Washington is back for its third year, and its mission is still the same; promoting activity tailored to everyone’s individual needs.

    According to the event’s organizer, Cabrina Buckman, the program is meant to encourage everyone to get physically active.

    “Many people find it as a friendly form of exercise,” she said. “It’s not too intimidating, and there are many ways to customize it in the way you like to exercise.”

  • Boone extradicted to Kentucky for trial

    John Robert “Johnny” Boone, the accused leader of the “Cornbread Mafia,” was brought back to Kentucky and appeared in a federal courtroom last week.

    According to Chief Deputy Brian Parrish of the U.S. Marshal Service, Boone was flown without incident to Lexington Wednesday and swiftly brought to Louisville for an initial case hearing.

  • Boone survey

    The Springfield Sun is conducting a survey about Johnny Boone and we want your opinion. Do you think he should go to trial for his alleged crimes, or do you think he should be set free? Your name and comments could be featured in next week’s issue of The Sun.
    Contact information will remain confidential and will only be used to reach you if we have any additional questions. Anyone simply wanting to vote without leaving their name may do so as well. Anonymous comments will not be published.

  • Sheriff's office receives clean financial audit

    Staff Writer
    The Washington County Sheriff’s Office received a clean financial audit last week when state auditor Mike Harmon found no issues with the office’s spending.

    “We were all very pleased with the results,” said Deputy Melissa Knopp, who also serves as the chief financial officer for the sheriff’s office. “We strive for results like this with all our audits.”

    The audit covered financial statements from the fiscal year that ended Dec. 31, 2015.

  • County approves first reading of 2017-18 budget

    Washington County Fiscal Court will be looking into possible ways of expanding broadband internet access to residents living in the county.

    The first reading of the 2017-18 fiscal year budget saw $20,000 set aside to research expanding high-speed internet access to rural parts of the county. The budget will be sent to Frankfort for approval before its second reading.

    Magistrate Hal B. Goode said he believes the court should look into finding some capital to research getting “a stronger broadband presence in Washington County.”

  • Bible Read-a-Thon completes 14th year

    For 14 years, Temple Baptist Church has been bringing people of different Christian faiths together.

    That’s because for a handful of days each spring, a Bible Read-a-Thon is hosted at the front steps of the 1816 Courthouse. No matter rain or shine, day or night, people sign up to help read the Bible from cover to cover in an effort to spread God’s love and wisdom leading up to the National Day of Prayer.

    Rev. Cal Adams, the pastor at Temple Baptist Church, said the program began after local realtor Steve Hale attended a read-a-thon in Washington D.C.

  • Officials discuss possible school resource officer

    City and county leaders, along with the Kentucky Center of School Safety, discussed the possibility adding a law enforcement officer in the county’s schools.

    According to Lucy Riffle, a retired middle school principal and representative for KCSS, school resource officers, or SROs, are a valuable addition to schools and not only help keep students safe, but act as role models, as well.

  • Murder remains unsolved after 27 years

    Twenty-seven years.

    That’s how long it has been since a Washington County native was murdered in Nelson County, and the case has never been solved.

    Lucinda (Osbourne) Strange, a 1969 graduate of Washington County High School, was found stabbed more than 40 times and left for dead a mere 150 yards away from her home on March 25, 1990. Though her case has gone cold, her death is not forgotten.

    Jerome Strange, Lucinda Strange’s husband, remembers the night as if it happened yesterday.  

  • The love of a dog

    Not many things bring a smile to a person’s face like the company of a dog.

    That’s the purpose of Canines for Christ, a program made up of volunteers who share their trained therapy dogs with others. The program gives volunteers a chance to share their dogs, as well as their faith, with residents of nursing homes and patients in hospitals.

  • Recycling center open at its new location

    The Washington County Recycling Center has moved to a new location in Springfield, and the county’s solid waste coordinator, Brad Langford, wants the public to know the center is open for business once again.

    “We’re just trying to get the word out,” he said. “Recycling is a good program, it’s good for the environment.”