Today's News

  • Seven candidates view for six city council spots

     Sun Staff


  • Magistrate passes over weekend

    Morris Goode Sweazy, well-known fiscal court magistrate and local entrepreneur, passed away at the age of 80 over the weekend. 

    According to Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles, Sweazy, who passed away Oct. 15, was in his third term of office serving District 4. 

    “He won the general election Nov. 7, 2006,” Settles said, “so he took office Jan. 1, 2007.”

  • WC ends regular season on win streak

    John Overby

    Sun Editor

    Washington County head volleyball coach John Rogers wanted to see his team enter district tournament play with plenty of momentum, and with a three-match winning streak to end the regular season, that’s exactly what he got. After losing three consecutive matches, the Commanderettes (19-13, 5-3) bounced back strong in their last three, defeating Anderson County, Franklin County and Bardstown.


  • Commanders shut out against DeSales

    The Washington County Commanders travelled to play the DeSales Colts this past Friday night, but WC was unable to come out with a win against a perennial Class 2A state championship contender, losing 55-0.

    Despite the final outcome, WC head coach Eric Sagrecy said he was pleased with the effort the Commanders (2-6, 1-1) consistently gave throughout the contest and especially in the first half.

  • Commanders get second straight win

    The Washington County Commanders (2-5, 1-0) lost their first five games of the season, but two blowout victories in a row have helped the team get its season back on track.

    WC built off its first victory of the season the week before — a 41-0 shutout of Trimble County — with a 56-20 district win over the Shawnee Golden Eagles (0-6, 0-1) this past Friday night.

    The tone of the game was set early on in the first quarter, when defensive back Trey Cheatham intercepted a Shawnee pass to give the Commanders possession.

  • Man indicted for human trafficking

     Sun Staff


    A Lebanon man has been indicted for human trafficking in Washington County.

    Gery E. Childers, 26, was indicted by a Washington County grand jury last week on three charges: human trafficking (victim under 18), a class B felony, unlawful transaction with a minor 1st degree, a class C felony, and being a persistent felony offender, 2nd degree. Bond was set at $10,000 full cash. He is to have no contact with complaining witness. 

  • Kentucky not fully compliant with REAL ID

    You may have to produce more than your Kentucky driver’s license or ID card to enter some federal facilities in the near future, and if something isn’t done by Jan. 22, 2018, you won’t be able to board a plane without an acceptable form of ID, either. 

    Washington County Circuit Clerk JoAnne Mudd-Miller said the federal government has denied an extension for the commonwealth to come into compliance with REAL ID, a federal regulation on ID cards. 

  • Local man fulfilling goal as novelist

    Growing up about 20 miles outside of Pittsburgh, Frank Mazur knew he wanted to be a novelist.

    In fact, the blurb under his high school yearbook photo said: “Aspires to be a teacher and a novelist.”

    “I’d always been into writing, and I read a lot of novels, even in high school,” Mazur said. “That was something that always just kind of stuck with me.”

  • Search for Warner continues

    It’s been more than three months since Crystal Warner and Robert Jones were murdered in Washington County, and while a suspect is in custody and Jones’ body has been recovered, Warner’s remains have yet to be found.

    According to Warner’s mother, Mary Reeve, things have slowed down but the search continues.

  • Recycling center on the move?

     The wheels have begun to turn with regards to moving the county’s recycling center. 

    A committee was formed Monday morning during Washington County Fiscal Court’s regularly scheduled meeting to recommend a location that would be convenient for the county and cost effective for the court. The committee consists of magistrates Billy Riney and Hal Goode, along with former county attorney Hamilton Simms.