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Today's News

  • BIRTHS: Tharp: It's a girl!

    Carol and Clyde Tharp of Springfield announce the birth of their daughter on Jan. 30, 2011 at Spring View Hospital in Lebanon.
    Alana Carol Tharp weighed 6 pounds, 9.5 ounces and was 20 inches in length.
    She was welcomed home by Jared Gullett, 15; Abbigail Gullett, 11; Landon Tharp, 4; Blake Tharp, 2; Daniel Tharp, 20 and Ben Tharp, 18.
    Maternal grandparents are Larry C. and Debbie Lanham of Springfield.
    Paternal grandfather is the late Clyde Tharp.

  • BIRTH: Atwood: It's a boy!

    Kelly and Robert Atwood of Bradfordsville announce the birth of their son on Jan. 24, 2011 at Spring View Hospital in Lebanon.
    Robert McKinley Atwood Jr. weighed 6 pounds, 9 ounces and was 19 inches in length.
    He was welcomed home by Alanna, age 8 and Brianna, age 4.
    Maternal grandparents are Rhoda Brady, Sandy Scott and Charlie Brady of Bradfordsville.
    Paternal grandparents are Francine and Dewayne Veatch of Hopewell, Va. and Anthony and Sandy Atwood of Lebanon.

  • BIRTH: Mattingly: It's a girl!

    Jessica and Anthony Mattingly of Springfield announce the birth of their daughter on Dec. 16, 2010 at Central Baptist Hospital in Lexington.
    Colleen Marie weighed 6 pounds, 7 ounces and was 20.5 inches long.
    She was welcomed home by a sister, Aubrey, age 18 months.
    Maternal grandparents are Pat and Connie Mackin of Springfield.
    Paternal grandparents are Tommy and Linda Mattingly of Lebanon.
    Great-grandparents are Edward Smith of Springfield and Anna Lois Mackin of Bardstown.

  • Market conditions, feed costs affect price

    This article came from Kevin Laurent, Extension Associate, University of Kentucky and we thought we would share it with you all.

    There were no CPH-45 sales held during the mid-December to mid-January time period.  This month we have included an historical summary of estimated net added returns for 600 pound steers selling in the Guthrie/Hopkinsville sales from 1993-2010.

  • Now is the time to control fruit diseases

    Winter, believe it or not, is a good time to prepare fruiting crops for the season ahead.  It has been too cold for most of the winter for many of us to feel like braving the outdoors to any activities that aren’t absolutely essential, but on the next warm day it is very important for us to get some work done to ensure a nice, fruity harvest this summer. 

  • Enter "I Love Cows" essay contest

    Twelve years ago, a program to encourage young people to get a head start in the beef industry was started in memory of a young man from Mercer County, Dustin Worthington.   Dustin’s main interest in life was working with cattle.  Unfortunately his life was cut short by a car accident.  Family and friends started the “I Love Cows” Essay Contest where young people involved in 4-H and FFA can write an essay about why they love cows and possibly win a registered beef heifer.  

  • Washington County schools will be closed Thursday, Feb. 10

    Washington County schools will be closed Thursday, Feb. 10, due to winter weather.

  • Commanderettes fall in All-A state opener

     

    The Washington County Commanderette basketball team opened play in the Touchtone Energy All-A Classic State Tournament Wednesday morning in Richmond. The Commanderettes fell 71-52 to Owensboro Catholic, which was led by Rebecca Greenwell with 39 points.


    See complete coverage of the Commanderttes' trip to the All-A state tournament in next week's Springfield Sun.

  • Local courts now using new e-Warrant system

    A job that once took days can now take just minutes to complete.
    The Washington County Circuit Clerk’s Office is among the latest to move to the e-warrant system for tracking warrants issued through Kentucky’s court system, and the process could save a lot of time for law enforcement officials, as well as court officials.

  • Snow days force school calendar adjustment

     

    Mother Nature has taken her toll on the 2010-11 Washington County school calendar, and that has left officials working hard to make up lost time.