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Today's News

  • Consider benefits of cover crops for gardens

    If you don’t normally plant a fall cover crop on your vegetable garden, you should seriously consider it. There are many benefits of fall cover crops of which I will discuss in this article.

    When you plant a fall cover crop, you eliminate many of the summer annual weeds from seeding, thus killing millions of future seedlings from germinating next spring and summer (how many weeds are going to seed right now in your garden?).

  • Commanderettes fight for district positioning

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    After two winning matches on the road, the Washington County Commanderettes hit their home hardwood last Thursday night against the Bethlehem Banshees for a district match-up that could have a big impact on district pairings.

  • Local community declared most sustainable in Kentucky

    Washington County Judge Executive John Settles and Springfield Mayor John Cecconi have declared their rural community “the greenest, most sustainable rural community in Kentucky.”  The official joint proclamation, approved this week by the county Fiscal Court and the City Council, will be publicly read from the main stage on Friday, Oct. 2, at 8 p.m. between the opening concerts of the Harvest Festival in Springfield.

  • UK ticket scam has local victims

    Rick Downs never played basketball at the University of Kentucky, but a former Wildcat basketball star is being accused of making a steal, and then a fast break with his money.

  • Soccer Pats keep battling

    SCC Sports Information

    In college soccer action last week the St. Catharine College men won one and lost one to bring their record to 4-2 for the season. At home Sunday they fell to Shawnee State (Ohio) 1-0. On Saturday the Patriots downed visiting Ohio Christian University 2-0.

    The 1-1 week left Paul Patton’s team with a 4-2 record as they ready themselves for Mid-South Conference play that starts Saturday with a game at West Virginia Tech.

  • From Left Field

    Did you see that?

    Sometimes there are moments in sports when everything comes together and makes our jobs worth every second we spend on the field, beside the court or behind the desk.

    This past Friday night, the football Commanders traveled to Lincoln County. While there have been signs of life in the WC offense this year, their 0-3 start had some questioning the team.

  • Social news and events

    BIRTHS

    Osbourne: It's a girl!

    Sydney Kathryn Osbourne

    Tara and James Osbourne of Springfield announce the birth of their daughter on Aug. 15, 2009 at Spring View Hospital in Lebanon.

    Sydney Kathryn weighed 8 pounds, 3 1/4 ounces and was 21 inches in length.

    Baker: It's a boy!

    James Dalton Baker

    Sara and James Baker of Lancaster announce the birth of their son at 12:32 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 22, 2009 at the Fort Logan Hospital.

  • Preconditioning considerations for spring-born calves

    With fall just around the corner, Kentucky beef producers will soon begin crafting marketing plans for spring-born calves. Even though producers were enjoying a less-challenging weather pattern this summer, many cow-calf producers have struggled to cover rising costs on a softer calf market.

    This makes post-weaning marketing plans especially important this year. Many cow-calf producers sell calves at weaning each year, regardless of what the market is doing.

  • Washington County girls’ golf enters final week

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    It’s not easy to beat 2-1 odds, but when you only have four team members like the Washington County Commanderette golf team, and visiting Nelson County brings eight girls to the match, you have to hang tough and take on the Lady Cards despite being double-teamed.

    Although Nelson County left Springfield with the match win, sophomore Callie Harmon tied for lowest individual score (46) with Lady Card Kim Kasama.

  • Festival to feature miniature farm landscape contest

    The cattle grazed in a pasture where a local farmer labored away in his field. His son rode a tractor across the farm’s property, while his daughter tended to the chickens. The rolling Kentucky countryside was the backdrop for this scene of everyday life in Washington County. The only noticeable difference in this picturesque moment was that the scenario was confined to an eight-foot-by-four-foot sheet of plywood.