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Today's News

  • Officials discuss possible school resource officer

    City and county leaders, along with the Kentucky Center of School Safety, discussed the possibility adding a law enforcement officer in the county’s schools.

    According to Lucy Riffle, a retired middle school principal and representative for KCSS, school resource officers, or SROs, are a valuable addition to schools and not only help keep students safe, but act as role models, as well.

  • Boone survey

    The Springfield Sun is conducting a survey about Johnny Boone and we want your opinion. Do you think he should go to trial for his alleged crimes, or do you think he should be set free? Your name and comments could be featured in next week’s issue of The Sun.
    Contact information will remain confidential and will only be used to reach you if we have any additional questions. Anyone simply wanting to vote without leaving their name may do so as well. Anonymous comments will not be published.

  • Boone extradicted to Kentucky for trial

    John Robert “Johnny” Boone, the accused leader of the “Cornbread Mafia,” was brought back to Kentucky and appeared in a federal courtroom last week.

    According to Chief Deputy Brian Parrish of the U.S. Marshal Service, Boone was flown without incident to Lexington Wednesday and swiftly brought to Louisville for an initial case hearing.

  • Commanderettes rout Bardstown

    A seven-run second inning helped the Washington County Commanderettes defeat Bardstown 15-0 in four innings Wednesday. The win helped keep Washington County moving toward an even record, now sitting at 9-11 for the season.

    Prior to the game, however, both teams put aside their rivalry to celebrate a common goal: defeating cancer. Players from both teams wore pink uniforms for Washington County’s “Pink Out” event, which honored friends and family members of both teams in their fight against cancer.

  • Commanders fall to Elizabethtown, beat Mercer and Campbellsville

    The Washington County Commanders baseball team played a back-and-forth game with Elizabethtown Wednesday, but a 10-run seventh inning eventually saw Elizabethtown prevail 15-6.

    “We played a good game up to that point,” said head coach Adam Blair. “We played #18 E-town toe to toe for 6 2/3 innings and just didn’t finish.”

  • Americans don't use their vacation hours

    Vacations; they’re a cornerstone of the modern workplace. Though some countries ¬– ahem, France – allow for people to take more of them, here in the Untied States, they’re a commodity that just isn’t used as much. 

    In fact, according to an article published on Fox News’ website, “Americans are just plain lousy at taking vacation.”

  • County plans to have budget of $6.3 million for 2017-18

    The Washington County Fiscal Court reviewed the first draft of its budget for the 2017-2018 fiscal year at its meeting Friday.

  • Recycling center open at its new location

    The Washington County Recycling Center has moved to a new location in Springfield, and the county’s solid waste coordinator, Brad Langford, wants the public to know the center is open for business once again.

    “We’re just trying to get the word out,” he said. “Recycling is a good program, it’s good for the environment.”

  • The love of a dog

    Not many things bring a smile to a person’s face like the company of a dog.

    That’s the purpose of Canines for Christ, a program made up of volunteers who share their trained therapy dogs with others. The program gives volunteers a chance to share their dogs, as well as their faith, with residents of nursing homes and patients in hospitals.

  • Murder remains unsolved after 27 years

    Twenty-seven years.

    That’s how long it has been since a Washington County native was murdered in Nelson County, and the case has never been solved.

    Lucinda (Osbourne) Strange, a 1969 graduate of Washington County High School, was found stabbed more than 40 times and left for dead a mere 150 yards away from her home on March 25, 1990. Though her case has gone cold, her death is not forgotten.

    Jerome Strange, Lucinda Strange’s husband, remembers the night as if it happened yesterday.