Today's News

  • Distinguished Young Women program is Saturday

    Fourteen rising seniors at Washington County High School will be competing Saturday for the chance to be Washington County’s next Distinguished Young Woman.

    This year’s program will be held at 7 p.m. on Saturday in the old WCHS gym, but for the entire group, preparation for the event began months ago.

    And some have even been working to attain the Distinguished Young Woman title since they were young girls, according to Lauren Riney, one of the program’s chairpersons.

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Dayanna Railey

    Keep it light-hearted and upbeat.

    Every time Dayanna Railey steps onto a softball field, she has a natural ability to keep herself and her teammates positive by doing these two things.

    “I just laugh everything off every time I make a mistake,” Railey said. “I have to be positive because if I don’t, I feel like I’m just letting the team down and the team is going to collapse with me. I think you’ve got to stay positive in order to succeed.

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Vanessa Mejia

     “She’s just a true spitfire.”

    Washington County Commanderette softball coach Christy Baker couldn’t think of any other way to describe one of her most outspoken leaders, Vanessa Mejia.

    ”She’s high energy, fun to be around,” Baker added. “She’s very vocal in the dugout and kind of helps lead the team there, which kind of sets the tone for how we play.”

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Mary Beth Begley

    When Mary Beth Begley first began playing tee-ball, she couldn’t contain how excited she was.

    She loved every aspect of the game from the very get-go, and from then on, she took full advantage of every chance she had to play softball.

    “I never stopped wanting to play,” Begley said. “I loved it that much. I just liked being part of a team, and I really just love baseball in general, so being able to play softball is one of my favorite things.”

  • WC baseball looks ahead to the future

    Clinching Washington County’s first back-to-back 19th District championships since 2001-2002 was on the minds of its players to begin the year, when they set it as a season goal.

    So being able to secure that milestone “meant a lot” to the Commanders, according to head coach Adam Blair.

  • Commanderettes make it to region finals

    As the Washington County Commanderettes (19-12) walked off the field, most — if not all — hanging their head in defeat, Commanderette fans rose in unison to give the players a standing ovation that rivaled the one received by the winning team. Even though WC’s season had ended in an 8-0 loss to Central Hardin in the 5th Region Tournament championship game, the Commanderettes had earned the fans’ praise by advancing further than any WC fast-pitch softball team had ever gone.


  • Schools moving forward with tax

    The clock is ticking for those who want to put a stop to the recallable nickel – that’s because Washington County School Board members voted 3-1 to move forward with the tax after a public hearing last week.  


    With board member Julita Nance-Leachman absent from the June 2 meeting, several board members took time to explain the reason behind their votes.


    Jeremy Thompson was the lone dissenter.


    Growing up in Washington County, Mac Stevens always enjoyed the small-town atmosphere of his hometown because, as he put it, “you have a lot more space than a lot of other kids do.”

    “In a highly populated area, you don’t have the opportunity to go and play whenever you want,” Stevens said. “You can go hiking, you can go backpacking. I’ve always liked that about living here.”

  • SENIOR SPOTLIGHT: Stephen Thompson

    Stephen Thompson first started playing baseball around the age of 3 or 4, and it was something he had fun doing from the very beginning. From the action on the field to the camaraderie in the dugout, Thompson enjoyed every aspect of this newfound sport.

  • St. Catharine College to close July 31

    When Saint Catharine College closes its doors signaling the end of summer classes, they will not be reopened in the fall.

    The school has announced it will be closing permanently on July 31, which will put a quiet end to the college’s 85 years of providing education to the tri-county area.

    John Turner, chairman of the board for SCC, and school president Dr. Cindy Gnadinger said the decision to close the Roman Catholic liberal arts college wasn’t one that was taken lightly.

    “It was a long meeting; it was a difficult meeting,” Gnadinger said.