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Today's News

  • Alpaca fiber plant set to open in Springfield

    You may not have heard of the name U.S. Natural Fibers yet – but you will soon.

    USNF is a fiber processing plant that is currently under works in Springfield and will bring several new jobs to the community in the months to come.

    Shawn Malloy, who helped found the companies Kentucky Royalty, and in 2013 Altera, both of which are known for their alpaca fiber socks, said the two companies are the catalyst of what’s to come with USNF.

  • His legacy lives on

    After a long battle with cancer, legendary girls’ basketball coach Bill Newton passed away last Monday, but the legacy he left behind will ensure that his mark is left on Washington County for years to come.

    Newton was the head coach of the Washington County Commanderettes for 26 seasons, compiling a 444-276 career record before stepping into retirement in 2003.

  • Patriots chop down Mighty Oaks, 76-72

    The Patriot women’s basketball team (9-13) returned to the friendly confines of Lourdes Hall on Saturday against Oakland City University (6-13).

    The Patriots trailed by three at the break, but turned it around in the final 20 minutes to come away with a 76-72 win.

    Cora Moore continued her hot streak with 17 points. Moore connected on half of her three-point attempts, going 5 for 10.

  • WC girls fall again

    The Washington County Commanderettes suffered another heartbreak during senior night when they lost a fiery matchup to the Cumberland County Lady Panthers, 54-50.

    It wasn’t all bad news for the girls, however. Junior Lexi Thompson led the girls in scoring by posting 18 points and joining the 500-point club, which was something she said felt great.

    “It all kind of flowed together,” Thompson said.

  • Third time is a charm

    The Washington County Commanders had a busy night between recognizing the team’s seniors and defeating the Cumberland County Panthers (0-22) in a heated affair on Feb. 6.

    The Commanders defeated the Panthers 59-49. The way the game ended was a relief to Commanders head coach Bernard Smalley.

    “It don’t happen very often,” Smalley said. “It felt really good.”

    He said he attributed the Commanders’ lead to their aggression.

  • Girls fall short 59-21

    The Washington County Commanderettes went in as underdogs and went down swinging when they fell to the Adair County Lady Indians 59-21 on Jan. 31.

    As of press time, the Lady Indians were second in the fifth region.
    Coming off a 70-25 loss against the Bardstown Tigers on Jan. 27, the Commanderettes (19-5), fell victim to a strong offense by both opponents.

    Washington County took deep cuts in the first half of the game against the Lady Indians, managing to score only once in the second quarter.

  • Commanders fall in double OT

    Going into double overtime and being just inches away from an upset, the Washington County Commanders fought tooth and nail against the Adair County Indians on Jan. 31.

    Despite their  best efforts, however, the Commanders fell 76-71 in the heated competition.
    Commanders head coach Bernard Smalley said you couldn’t be upset with a loss like that.

    “The kids played their hearts out,” Smalley said. “I can’t say anything, nothing negative.”
    He added the game could have gone either way.

  • News briefs 2/4

    Ongoing

    Protect Your Family

    Narconon would like to remind families that the use of addicting drugs is on the rise. Take steps to protect your family from drug use. If you know anyone who is struggling with drug addiction, get him or her the help they need. Call for a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all drugs. Narconon also offers free screenings and referrals.  Call 800-431-1754 or visit DrugAbuseSolution.com on the Internet.

    Volunteers Needed

  • February Sew This & That

    Marion Mulligan and Rita Yates

    Once upon a time there was an old black winter coat; it wasn’t expensive, but it had a nice fit and worthy of upgrading.  Sadly the back lining had split down the middle and torn away from the stitches. During one of our Sew This & That consultations we concluded that the stitched-at-the-bottom lining contributed to the ripping, as there was no ease for movement.  Now a new heavier red lining will be created and will be free-swinging once inside the coat. 

  • ‘Precious Memories’ of a forgotten activist

    Bell County native Sarah Ogan Gunning became a renowned activist and folk performer in the mid-20th Century, but in the years since her death in 1983, much of her legacy has been forgotten by the general public.

    Born in 1910, Gunning was raised during the rise of the coal industry and the Great Depression, and faced numerous hardships.

    Her struggle to overcome her situation led to the inspiration of modern-day activists like Sue Massek.