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Today's News

  • Training to Protect and Serve

    It was like something that came straight out of someone’s worst nightmare.

    Springfield K-9 officer Nick Holmes carefully made his way into a nondescript building and through the halls with his patrol rifle. Step by step, he tiptoed around the body of a victim as the loud crack of gunshots echoed from deeper within, getting louder with each passing breath.

    Without warning, a woman who came running for help was grabbed across the chest by a gunman and used as a human shield.

  • Downs is named Distinguished Young Woman

    It ended with a crowd swarming to catch a closer look – and maybe photo of – 2018’s Distinguished Young Woman Saturday night.

    Sarah Downs, 17, daughter of Elaine and the late Stephen Downs, was given the title after winning awards for fitness, spirit, self expression, interviewing and preliminary scholastics during the 44th annual event.

    “Oh, my gosh,” Downs said. “I’m on top of the world right now.”

    She said she was elated when she heard her name called, but was nervous at the same time. 

  • It's time for sunscreen

    By Cabrina Buckman

    County Extension Agent

  • Taking advantage of in-season produce

    By Mackenzie Messer

    Extension Intern

  • Reviewing the 2017 Commanderette softball season

    The Washington County Commanderettes finished a very strong 2016-17 season. The team finished 15-15 overall, but that included a second consecutive 19th District Championship and a berth into the Region 5 Softball Tournament. They also won the 12th Region All “A” Classic in April for the first time in school history, earning them a spot in the All “A” State Tournament. Head coach Christy Baker was very pleased with how the season went and being able to win district for just the second time in school history.

  • Reviewing the 2017 Commanders baseball season

    The 2016-17 Washington County baseball team has closed the book on another season. The team did well overall, going 19-17 and competing in the 19th District Baseball Tournament. They also had the chance to travel to Tennessee in April to compete in tournament play there. Head coach Adam Blair was pleased with finishing the season with a positive record and competing against quality teams both in and out of state.

  • 6/7 Briefs

    Ongoing
    Summer Feeding Program
    The Washington County Board of Education is participating in the Summer Food Service Program from May 30 – July 28.  Meals will be provided to all children without charge and are the same for all children regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability, and there will be no discrimination in the course of the meal service.  Hot lunch meals will be provided at the site and time listed below:

  • Chesser combats blindness, becomes Coca-Cola Scholar

    One Washington County woman is not letting blindness get in the way of achieving her dreams.

    Deanna Chesser, 47, is legally blind, and she was recently named Kentucky’s Coca-Cola New Century Scholar.

    When she found out she received the scholarship, she said “it was overwhelming.”

    “You have to be nominated by your college,” Chesser said.

  • Hot cars are a danger to people and pets

    As summer inches ever closer, temperatures are on the rise. As hot as it gets outside in the summer months, one place in particular can become dangerously unbearable: your car.

    That’s because when the sun heats the air inside a vehicle, it has nowhere to go, creating a “greenhouse effect.” In just 10 minutes, the interior of any vehicle can reach temperatures over 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and even on less hot days it can increase by as much as 40 degrees.

  • County unemployment rate in top 15

    Washington County has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the commonwealth.

    According to the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training, the county sits in the top 15 lowest rates in Kentucky, joining Allen, Boone, Campbell, Henry, and Monroe counties at 3.9 percent.

    Woodford County has the lowest unemployment rate in the state with 3.1 percent.

    Springfield Washington County Economic Development Authority Director Daniel Carney said the low percentage rate can be attributed to expansion projects undertaken by local industries.