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Today's News

  • Future of career center discussed by Springfield City Council

    The Springfield Tourism Commission and the Springfield City Council met in a joint session on Monday, Feb. 27, in the Opera House conference room to discuss the future of the career center in Washington County.

  • Hernandez named Junior Mister

    More than $3,000 was raised for Washington County Relay for Life during 2017’s Junior Mister contest Saturday night.

    According to Traci Blandford, an organizer for the event, a total of $3,100 was raised for the cause. Debbie McIntosh emceed the well-attended event, which was hosted at the River of Life Church in Springfield. 

    Jesus Hernandez was named this year’s junior mister after 10 boys competed for the title. Hernandez also won self-expression, talent, interview and spirit awards. 

  • Couple arrested in cattle-rustling case

    A man and woman were arrested and charged with receiving stolen property in a modern day cattle-rustling case. 

    Washington County Sheriff Jerry Pinkston said Jennifer Moore, 38, and Steven Jones, 31, were arrested after allegedly selling stolen cattle at the Washington County Livestock Center last week. 

  • Celebrating Black History Month

    A group of women are working to honor African Americans in Washington County, and they’re doing it one person at a time.

    The idea for honoring three African American men from Washington County’s past came with a simple walk through downtown.

    Julia Stateman said she was walking around when she saw benches on Main Street and had the idea to dedicate one to Louis Sansbury, a man who risked his life to care for the sick and bury the dead during two cholera epidemics in the 1800s.

  • Hunt serves Sorghum Festival for more than 30 years

    This year’s Sidewalk Hall of Fame winner is a woman who’s worked tirelessly for years in Washington County. 

    Roberta Hunt, Washington County extension agent, was announced to be this year’s winner at the Springfield-Washington County Chamber of Commerce awards gala.

    “Without Miss Roberta Hunt’s help and her involvement with teen leadership, this venture may have failed before it even started,” ... said.  

    She said it was a surprise to learn she had won the award.

  • Celebrating Black History Month

    As an elected official, those who serve have immense responsibility to serve and protect the community they represent. Springfield’s mayor, Debbie Wakefield, uses her responsibilities to enact positive change within her community.

    Wakefield, a lifelong resident of Springfield, is a 1984 graduate of St. Dominic School and a 1988 graduate of Washington County High School. She took office as Springfield’s mayor in January 2015 and said it’s an honor serving a place she’s lived and loved all her life. 

  • Petition to become wet circles county

    A countywide wet/dry petition is circling around, and the number of signatures required to put the measure on the ballot is not exactly known. 

    Washington County Clerk Glenn Black said the number of signatures required will be based on when the first signature was put on paper.

  • Smith reflects on a lifetime of achievements

    Springfield City Administrator Laurie Smith is no stranger to the long hours or difficulties that come with being a community leader. 

    In fact, her hard work and perseverance are a big reason why Springfield has been able to build a farmers market, renovate the Opera House, and transform the Robertson building into a residential and commercial space. 

  • Learning starts before the classroom

    According to the Washington County Board of Education, there are things parents can do now that will help their kids later on down the road as they prepare for preschool. 

    Assistant Superintendent Jason Simpson and Paula Turner, assistant director of special education, said engaging young children on a deeper level will help better prepare them for preschool and kindergarten. 

    “We love the how and why questions,” Turner said. “Because that makes them think beyond a simple answer.”

  • Celebrating Black History Month

    Tyler Brown

    Staff Writer

    Black History Month is a time to reflect on the numerous achievements made by African Americans in this country. Many dedicated their lives to the betterment of their communities on a national scale, but there are those who served at the local level.

    In Washington County, a name recognized by many is George Melwood Hocker.