.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Commanders still looking for season’s first victory

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    The Washington County Commanders got to break in that “new season smell” as the 2009/10 basketball season got under way last Tuesday with WC on the road at Taylor County. The host Cardinals weren’t very hospitable to their guests, as they handily won, 62-23.

    WC hit a three-pointer early to lead 3-1, but it was all Taylor County from that point.

  • Grigsby chosen Community Volunteer of the Year

    At the Nov. 12 meeting of the Washington County Relay for Life committee, the American Cancer Society presented Wilma Grigsby with an award for Mid-South Division Community Volunteer of the Year for 2008-09 in Washington County. The honor recognizes the years of service Grigsby has put in as a volunteer for Relay and for the American Cancer Society.

  • Library offers resources for entrepreneurs

    With more and more people looking for employment or trying to find ways to supplement their income, many are turning to entrepreneurial resources to start up or expand their own business. Through a partnership with the Kentucky Entrepreneurial Coaches Institute, the Washington County Public Library now has a local Entrepreneurs Resource Center that will offer not only printed materials for job-seekers and potential business owners, but also a wealth of information available on the Internet.

  • Plan for next season; sign up for programs

    After the harvest season, November is usually the time we celebrate and give thanks. It is also time for producers and landowners to consider planning for the next growing season.

    Each fiscal year, the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) sets dates for program application ranking. Although dates may vary from one program to another, landowners may sign-up at any time for all conservation programs.

  • WC girls get first win vs. Boyle

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    The Commanderettes notched their first victory of the season Monday night with a 68-59 win over Boyle County.

    Washington County’s 6’2” freshman Kenya Turner was a rebounding tour de force, getting plenty of action off both the defensive and offensive glass. Kayla Edelen also added some height, and when paired with the speed of Shay Yocum, the Commanderettes were able to outpace the Lady Rebels in three out of four quarters of play.

  • From Left Field

    Dear deer

  • Charged deputies now ex-employees

    Norris Wayne Bartley and Billy Joe Mattingly II haven't reported for work since Nov. 12 . Since that time, the two Washington County Sheriff deputies have either been in the custody of the Marion County Detention Center or under house arrest pending their hearing for marijuana trafficking and other charges. With these two public figures facing multiple felonies, Washington County Sheriff Tommy Bartley presented the Washington County Fiscal Court formally with termination letters for both Bartley, no relation to the sheriff, and Mattingly during an executive session at their Nov.

  • Patriot men go 10-1 in November

    SCC Sports Information

    The St. Catharine College Patriots played three basketball games last week against teams with a combined record of 3-16. But while head coach J.T. Burton recognized the talent level his team faced, he also credited his own squad for taking care of business.

    “We didn’t look ready to play Friday and it showed with 28 turnovers,” said Burton. “But Saturday we came out focused. We are up 60 points in that game and our guys are still taking charges.”

  • Poor nutrition can have delayed effects

    This has been a great year for forage production in our part of the country.  We’ve had plenty of grass for the grazing season with lots to spare for hay-making.  We still have accumulated fescue pasture which can be grazed this winter.

  • Wet harvest could cause soil compaction

    Wet weather in September and October caused many producers to harvest corn and soybeans in less-than-ideal conditions. With the majority of this year’s crop now harvested, producers should check their fields for signs of compaction, said Lloyd Murdock, a soil scientist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.