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Today's News

  • Local police to fight drunk driving

    The Springfield Police Departments and local M.A.D.D. Chapter wish to remind everyone that Over the Limit. Under Arrest’ Crackdown will be observed Sept. 1, 2009 through the Labor Day Weekend.

  • School tax increase approved

    Some were for it, and some were against it. Either way, about 30 people turned out to see what decision the Washington County School Board would make on the proposed school tax increase.

  • Patriot soccer seasons open at home Saturday

    SCC Sports Information

    Even with a super-difficult schedule that includes a tough Mid-South Conference slate, St. Catharine College soccer coach Paul Patton looks for continued improvement this season for both the Patriot men and women.

  • WCHS principal Leon Smith is new superintendent at Russellville

    In April, Leon Smith said he planned to remain as principal of Washington County High School after being a finalist for the Campbellsville Schools superintendent position. He said he would put some “feelers out there,” but he would stay in Washington County unless something came up.

    On Monday night, something did come up.

    Smith, after being named a finalist for the position of superintendent of Russellville Schools in Logan County, was officially named superintendent of that school system.

  • School tax increase passes unanimously

    The Washington County School Board unanimously voted Wednesday night to pass the tax increase from 50.8 to 52.9 cents per $100 of assessed property value.

    A group of about 30 people were on hand for the meeting, and a balanced mixture of those in favor were on hand to voice their opinions, as well as a group against the tax increase.

  • Simms signs with MCU

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    He used to be a Commander, but now he’s a Cougar. Washington County graduate Joe Joe Simms signed to play baseball at Mid-Continent University last Friday.

    Simms has some interest in Mid-Continent’s business program, but he would really like to study biology. He hasn’t ruled out the possibility of transferring to a bigger school later.

  • 4-H Sharpshooters compete at Adair County

    The first days of the Kentucky State Fair were successful for Washington County 4-H members.  I have seen many Washington County families and individuals enjoying the fair and visiting Cloverville to see the completed 4-H projects and the many 4-H events going on during the fair.  This week will involve 4-H members showing cattle and local 4-H members presenting and performing on Thursday which will be District 5 Day in Cloverville.  Watch in a few weeks for all of the 4-H results from the Kentucky State Fair.  Hope to see more of you this week at the fair!

  • Ky. Forage and Grassland Council Field Day is Sept. 3

    The Kentucky Forage and Grassland Council Field Day will be held on Thursday, Sept. 3, from 4:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m.  I will be going myself if anyone is interested in carpooling, please contact me. 

    Listed below is the agenda.

    1. 11 acres if Eastern Gamagrass Interseeded with Red Clover and Pasja Forage Turnips for Summer Grazing.  –Dr. Glen Aiken, USDA Agricultural Research Service Animal Scientist.

    2. Alfalfa/Orchardgrass Hay Production and Management - Dr. Garry Lacefield, Extension Forage Specialist.

  • Football boosters award scholarships

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    It’s a testament to hard work and dedication when a student-athlete not only excels on the field of competition, but also performs well in the classroom. For all of that hard work, recent WC grads Lee Mudd and Joe Joe Simms were presented academic scholarships from the Washington County football boosters last week.

    The boosters present a $500 annual award to a Commander player who displays a continued level of excellence during their years of study, as well as their time in uniform.

  • Reader helps clarify a matter of local history

    Here at The Springfield Sun, we take a lot of stock in what our readers have to say. That’s why when a call came to the office last week from a long-time reader, Violet Elliott, I wasted no time in taking her advice.

    When Mrs. Elliott called my office, she was very polite as she informed me I had made a mistake in a recent news story. That mistake was made when I reported that Robin Cochran was the first female superintendent in the history of Washington County schools.