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Today's News

  • Blandford is nominee for Kentucky teacher of the year

    Millie Blandford, integrated science teacher at Washington County High School, has been nominated for the Kentucky Teacher of the Year award sponsored by Ashland, Inc.

  • From Left Field: Cubs get lemons, can’t make lemonade

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    Whew! Just when I thought someone had kidnapped the real Chicago Cubs and replaced them with another team, they finally showed up in the NLDS against the Dodgers. With the sweep over the Cubs by Los Angeles, I can sleep well at night knowing that the continued curse of the Cubs is still intact.

  • Toyotomi expanding, adding equipment

    Toyotomi first arrived in Washington County nearly 10 years ago, and for the past eight years, the company has been producing automotive products in the community while providing employment to local workers. Despite tough times in the economy locally and globally, the company has announced a $1 million expansion of its current facilities, as well as the purchase of a new $7 million transfer press to be used in the manufacture of some of its products.

  • Commanders’ air attack is tops in state

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    If you can’t go through them, then go over their heads. That seems to be the new approach to Washington County’s offense this season. With a young squad loaded with sophomores and freshmen, the Commanders have taken to the air to put some points on the board, and it seems to be a productive method of operation. WC is at the top or near the top of all offensive categories in Kentucky Class 2A football.

  • Church, restaurant hit by burglars

    According to Springfield Police, a local church and a restaurant were robbed some time Sunday night. Authorities say someone used a pry bar to open a locked door and gain entry to The River of Life Church on KY 555 in Springfield.

    A pry bar was also used to open several locked offices. The suspect(s) took some money from a desk and also stole money from a soda machine.

    In what police say is a related incident, someone also used a pry bar that same night to break into Backyard BBQ, located at the intersection of KY 555 and Lincoln Park Road in Springfield.

  • Follow these top seven composting secrets

    Officially composting is a controlled natural biological process where bacteria, fungi (microbes), and other organisms decompose organic wastes. This is a clever scientific definition of composting but basically it’s allowing organic material to decompose into humus or compost or basically “dirt”.

    There are several key steps in making compost and the top seven are below:

  • Deadline for supplemental disaster assistance is Sept. 16

    Farm Service Agency (FSA) State Executive Director Jeffery Hall reminds producers of the deadline for those who want to ensure eligibility for crop yield losses under the new Supplemental Revenue Assistance Program (SURE), Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP), Tree Assistance Program (TAP), and Emergency Assistance Livestock, Honeybees and Farm-Raised Fish Program (ELAP). Sept. 16 is the last day to pay the “buy-in” fee for crops, including grazing lands that are not fully covered by crop insurance or the noninsured crop disaster assistance program (NAP).

  • Frost brings danger: Prussic acid poisoning

    As we move into October the likelihood of frost increases. The best way to prevent losses from Prussic Acid is to be aware and plan ahead. The following information will help to be aware and prepared.

    The primary cause of hydrocyanic (prussic) acid poisoning in domestic animals is the ingestion of plants containing this potent toxin. Cyanide-producing compounds (cyanogenic glucosides) occurring in living plant cells are converted to prussic acid when cells are crushed or otherwise ruptured.

  • Library offers form for objectionable material

    There is no public vote on material selected for Kentucky’s public libraries, but there is a way for patrons to voice their concerns.

    Each library in Kentucky offers its visitors the opportunity to speak out on material by completing a form known as a request for reconsideration form. That form, when completed, is passed on to the library board for review and a decision on the material. If any citizen believes material in the library is not appropriate and should be removed, the form is completed and makes its way through the proper channels.

  • Hay supplies up, but not back to normal

    Even though the majority of the state is in the midst of a drought, hay supplies are up from last year. However, some livestock producers will still need to find an additional hay source to get through the winter, said Tom Keene, hay marketing specialist with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture.

    “Overall, we are in decent to fair shape on cattle hay going into the winter,” he said. “Producers who use high quality hay to feed dairy cattle and horses will likely need to import additional quantities this year to have a sufficient supply.”