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Today's News

  • Central Hardin sweeps volleyballers

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    After taking a week off to regroup, the Washington County High School volleyball team faced a roaring locomotive named Central Hardin on Monday night. Central Hardin swept all squads, winning 2-0 in freshman, JV and varsity action.

    Varsity

  • Cheser: It's a boy

    Sherri and Bill Cheser of Springfield announce the birth of their son on July 30, 2008 at Spring View Hospital in Lebanon.

    Brandon Matthew Cheser weighed 9 pounds, 12.5 ounces and was 21.5 inches in length.

  • Minor blue mold outbreak reminds farmers to practice caution

    A minor blue mold outbreak in Shelby, Henry and Oldham counties is a late-season reminder to tobacco farmers not to let their guards down just yet.

  • New school traffic pattern starts Sept. 8

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    During the 2007-08 school year, traffic for afternoon dismissal at Washington County Elementary School was among the largest problems on the plate of the school. While the officials looked for a smooth-running system to dismiss students being picked up by parents, local police were busy trying to keep Doctor Street, which lies behind the school, clear of traffic jams.

  • Ballot set for local election

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    When Washington County voters go to the polls this fall, they will have some choices in several local races.

    Three school board seats will be up for election, but only two of the current members will face opposition.

  • Brown leaving school system for state education job

    By Jeff Moreland

    Editor/General Manager

    They say you can’t go home again, but Robert Brown doesn’t agree.

    For the past two years, Brown has served as assistant superintendent of Washington County Schools, but Friday was his last day on the job. He leaves Washington County to return to the job he previously held for three years in Frankfort as director in the division of professional learning and assessment at the Education and Professional Standards Board in Frankfort.

  • Volleyball season opens for WCHS

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    The Washington County High School Commanderettes volleyball team opened its 2008 schedule last week at Campbellsville on Aug. 12. It was a great debut for the JV and varsity teams as Campsbellville failed to win a single game.

    The JV squad won 2-0 (21-10, 21-17) and the varsity squad shut out the Lady Eagles, also winning 2-0 (25-20, 25-19).

    Vs. Green County

    The Commanderettes played their first home game of the year vs. Green County on Aug. 14.

  • YMCA flag football

    The Wilderness Trace Family YMCA announces their upcoming flag football program.

    It is for kindergarten through third graders.

    The season starts in September and will go through October.

    You can call the office or stop by Washington County Elementary School to sign up.

  • From Left Field: Brand loyalty

    By Jimmie Earls

    Sun Sports Writer

    I'm sure as sports fans, we've all had those times in our lives when we dislike a particular player so much, we vow to never cheer for them no matter what. But what would happen if that player suddenly became a member of your favorite team? Although it is highly unlikely, given his huge inflated salary to go along with his huge inflated ego, what if Barry Bonds signed with the Cincinnati Reds?

  • Indications are prices will continue to climb

    The following is from University of Kentucky Ag Economics Department. I thought it was a very good article and would like to share it with you all.

    Rising costs put farming in center of perfect storm

    For the first time in 30 years, grain farmers received a raise, but they might not see as much of it as they would like, according to a University of Kentucky agronomist. Cattle producers are facing declining revenues. Vegetable growers are feeling squeezed both on the farm and beyond the farm gate. Blame it on the soaring price of inputs.