Today's News

  • Volleyball returns from All "A" State

    For the second straight year, the Washington County Commanderettes (7-11, 2-4) found themselves playing in the All “A” State Classic, which was held at the Mid-America Sports Complex in Louisville this past weekend.

    Play in the All “A” State tournament consists of a three-match pool play, where the top teams — based on the teams’ records from the pool play — move on to a winner’s bracket and the bottom two teams play in the consolation bracket.

  • Rebels spoil WC homecoming

    Injuries are a part of football, but Washington County Commanders (2-3) head coach Eric Sagrecy had never enountered a situation like he had to face on Friday night in a 26-16 loss to the Casey County Rebels (3-2).

    Four starters were forced out of action either the day before or during the game. Chaz Curtsinger, a starter on the defensive line, was hurt during walkthrough, and Morrison Smith, Garrett Floyd and Anterius Edelen all sustained injuries in the first half, forcing them out for the remainder of the game.

  • Bluegrass Dairy, house take damage in separate fires

    The Washington County Fire Department responded to a late night fire last week on McMurtry Lane off of Highway 55 that left no one injured but two dogs dead. They received mutual aid from the Willisburg and Mackville Fire Departments in battling the blaze.

    According to Washington County Fire Chief Jim Logsdon, they received the call at 10:58 p.m. on Sept. 15 and responders were on scene 10 minutes later.

  • Rash of trailer thefts hits county

    On Sept. 9, a trailer was stolen in Washington County, along with a lawnmower and air compressor. And according to Washington County Sheriff’s Deputy Melissa Knopp, it’s just one of several thefts of its kind in the county.  

    “Most of these have all occurred during broad daylight,” Knopp said. “People will leave their trailers in their side yards, back yards and people will just drive up, hook to them, take right off. You know, it takes a matter of minutes.”  

  • Climate Change Rally to be held in Springfield

    The Washington County Judicial Center will be a hotbed of activity this week as the We Stand with Francis on Climate Change Rally is set to take place Thursday.

    “It’s a rally to publically say that we of New Pioneers and the people of the area, meaning the tri-county area … stand with Pope Francis, who’s going to be speaking that morning to a joint session of congress on the urgent need to do something about climate change,” Sister Claire McGowan, executive director of New Pioneers for a Sustainable Future said.

  • Commanderettes hit rough patch

    With a chance to improve its district record, the Washington County Commanderettes (6-5, 2-2) were unable to come away with a road victory against the Bardstown Tigers (6-6, 1-3) last Thursday night, losing in straight sets.

    Each set turned out to be a battle, though, as WC didn’t lose a single game by more than five points. WC dropped the first set 25-23, and Bardstown extended each win total from that point on, winning the second set 25-22 and the elimination game 25-20.

  • Cox competes in All "A" State

    Washington County golfer Emily Cox has made a habit of competing at the All “A” State Classic, having qualified for the event each of the past six years.

    Cox used that experience to help secure another strong finish in this year’s tournament last Saturday at Woodson Bend Resort in Pulaski County, carding an 88 overall and tying for 23rd place out of 88 competitors.

  • On a Roll

    Coming out victorious in down-to-the-wire football games has become the norm for this year’s Washington County Commanders (2-2), who pulled out a thrilling 34-27 win over the Thomas Nelson Generals (1-3) on Friday night.

    It was the second victory in a row for the Commanders, and it was also the second consecutive game where the outcome wouldn’t be decided until the final whistle, following WC’s 40-36 win over Kentucky Country Day last week.

  • Sorghum has deep roots in Springfield

    Before the first Sorghum Festival was celebrated in 1976, Washington County Extension Agent Rick Greenwell said festivals were springing up all over the region at the time.

    And the Springfield-Washington County’s Chamber of Commerce wanted one of it’s own and wanted to name the festival something that would keep a rural theme.

    “They came up with sorghum because nobody else had that,” Greenwell said.

    At the time, he said Washington County had a few sorghum producers.

  • County hears road concern

    Washington County Fiscal Court met during its regularly scheduled meeting Monday, and heard from some very concerned citizens who live in the Beechwood Subdivision off of Hwy. 555. 

    Their request? One hundred percent funding to pave the Beechwood Subdivision and for the county to take over all of the maintenance of the road.