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Today's News

  • A long tenure’s end

    Washington County Attorney Hamilton Simms is counting down his final days in county government, and he was recognized by the community for his service on Friday.

    In a reception held at the 1816 Courthouse building Friday afternoon, Washington County Judge-Executive John Settles reflected on Simms’ career and said he never stopped learning while working with him.

  • PHOTOS: Christmas in Mackville
  • SPD raises funds for local kids’ Christmas

    Last week, the Springfield Police Department decided to set up a pair of roadblocks in town for one hour to see how much money they could raise to support a family in need this Christmas. They soon found out that the outpouring of support meant they’d be able to help a few more people than they’d even expected this holiday season.

    Earlier this month, the department posted on its Facebook page that they were looking to help a family in need to buy Christmas presents.

  • Gas prices could hurt counties

    With gas prices falling to new lows, people’s wallets might be feeling a little heavier, except for the commonwealth’s. That’s because the state’s gas tax rate is also expected to fall.

    In a Washington County Fiscal Court meeting held on Dec. 7, Judge-Executive John Settles made it known that the state tax rate on gas prices can only rise in increments, but has no floor when fuel prices drop. This could be a major concern for roadways in the years to come because 48.5 percent of the state gas tax goes to county roads.

  • Coleman denied parole

    Jamie Satterfield
    Knoxville News Sentinel

    NASHVILLE — In her first public comments since she was arrested in one of Knoxville’s most horrific crimes, Vanessa Coleman on Wednesday said her only crime was in choosing the wrong people with whom to associate.

  • PHOTOS: Open at long last

    The new Washington County High School had its big reveal Monday night, with a countless number of community members stopping by to check out the open house.

    Following the school board meeting, the doors were opened to tours of the facility and a ribbon-cutting cereomy marked the occasion.
    WCHS students spearheaded the event by leading tours and preparing a welcome video.

    Principal Thad Elmore expressed excitement on his behalf as well as his students for the opening of the facility, and Superintendent Robin Cochran welcomed those in attendance.

  • Wolz Tabbed South Region Coach of the Year

    One of the career goals of Tim Wolz was to become the first coach in the history of the Mid-South Conference to win Coach of the Year in both men’s and women’s soccer. He reached that milestone this season when he received the honor for the men’s St. Catharine College program to go along with the distinction for women’s soccer he received at Cumberland College in 2002.

  • Woods makes history

     

    With the soccer season coming to an end, the men’s soccer team continues to make history. Ashley Woods added to his accomplishments with quite possibly the highest honor he’s ever received.

    Woods, a senior from Manchester, England, was named as an All-American honorable mention on Monday. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics All-America committee consists of the NAIA Men’s Soccer Coaches Association Executive

  • SCC’s Just and Strickland named All-Americans

    The St. Catharine volleyball team is coming off their best season in school history and the banner year continued into the post-season.

    Rebecca Just was named an All-American Honorable Mention and her teammate, Jordan Strickland was named to the All-American Third Team by the NAIA.

  • WCHS golf team’s senior

    Luke Mattingly has been playing golf since he was old enough to pick up a club. For the last four years, however, he’s played for Washington County High School’s golf team.

    Three of those years, he played at the varsity level.

    The young golfer spent his freshman year on the junior varsity team. But his start in the game is humble, like many young athletes.

    “I started out just like practicing and stuff as a little kid with my dad,” Mattingly said.

    “I started (at age) three or four.”