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Today's News

  • 3/29/2017 Briefs

    Kindergarten Registration

    If your child will be attending Washington County Elementary School in the fall and you missed registration, please stop by the school office to complete a packet as soon as possible.  Planning for next year has already begun, so it is very important to come and register your child as soon as possible.  The school office is open Monday – Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.      

     

    Head Start Applications

  • Tree and shrub planting

    Now is a good time to add trees and shrubs to your lawn and landscape.  It is important to keep in mind that proper planting now will save you money, time, and labor in the future; so do it right the first time!

  • Law and Justice Day for Teen Leadership

    Thursday, March 9 was Law and Justice Day for Teen Leadership Washington County. On Law and Justice Day we got to do an activity similar to the Amazing Race to learn about the law and justice system of our community. The day was organized by District Judge Amy Anderson. We got to go to the new Washington Co. Judicial Center, the old court house, lawyers’ offices, and the Marion County Detention Center. The day was fun filled and we learned a lot about our community that we never knew.

  • 3/22/2017 Briefs

    Kindergarten 

    Registration

    If your child will be attending Washington County Elementary School in the fall and you missed registration, please stop by the school office to complete a packet as soon as possible.  Planning for next year has already begun, so it is very important to come and register your child as soon as possible.  The school office is open Monday – Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.      

     

    Head Start

    Applications

  • ATF, KSP offer reward for information on violent felon

    The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the Kentucky State Police (KSP) – have announced a reward of up to $1,500 for information leading to the arrest of Bobby Green.    

  • Commanders fall to Marion County in season opener

    Washington County’s baseball season opener started off well, but a few late-game errors led to a disappointing 4-2 loss to the Marion County Knights Friday.

    Head coach Adam Blair said his team played well overall, but errors kept them from keeping the momentum, and Marion County took advantage.

    “We started off scoring runs in the first two innings and playing well on both sides of the ball,” Blair said. “Overall, we played well for the first game.”

  • Future of career center discussed by Springfield City Council

    The Springfield Tourism Commission and the Springfield City Council met in a joint session on Monday, Feb. 27, in the Opera House conference room to discuss the future of the career center in Washington County.

  • Hernandez named Junior Mister

    More than $3,000 was raised for Washington County Relay for Life during 2017’s Junior Mister contest Saturday night.

    According to Traci Blandford, an organizer for the event, a total of $3,100 was raised for the cause. Debbie McIntosh emceed the well-attended event, which was hosted at the River of Life Church in Springfield. 

    Jesus Hernandez was named this year’s junior mister after 10 boys competed for the title. Hernandez also won self-expression, talent, interview and spirit awards. 

  • Couple arrested in cattle-rustling case

    A man and woman were arrested and charged with receiving stolen property in a modern day cattle-rustling case. 

    Washington County Sheriff Jerry Pinkston said Jennifer Moore, 38, and Steven Jones, 31, were arrested after allegedly selling stolen cattle at the Washington County Livestock Center last week. 

  • Celebrating Black History Month

    A group of women are working to honor African Americans in Washington County, and they’re doing it one person at a time.

    The idea for honoring three African American men from Washington County’s past came with a simple walk through downtown.

    Julia Stateman said she was walking around when she saw benches on Main Street and had the idea to dedicate one to Louis Sansbury, a man who risked his life to care for the sick and bury the dead during two cholera epidemics in the 1800s.