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Columns

  • The future is now!

    I was watching TV while pumping gas the other day and … no, that’s what I said. I was watching TV while pumping gas. You’ve probably done it, too.

    As I stood in front of the pump and waited for my tank to fill, it dawned on me just how badly we need to be entertained today. We can’t have a single moment without something to keep our attention.

  • Can you remember this?

    There are three surefire signs of getting old.  The first is forgetfulness.  I don’t remember what the other two are.
    Must not have been important.

    Anyway, now that I’m a senior citizen, I can tell you that my memory isn’t what it used to be.  If I didn’t then Cindy would.

    Unlike myself, Cindy has a photographic memory and never forgets anything.  It’s something that comes in quite handy for her when we have “loud discussions” at home.  Any of you other guys have that problem out there?

  • Me, Jenny and Ranger Randy

    A few weeks ago I wrote an article about 24 days of extreme outdoor hiking, repelling, rock climbing, and canoeing I did with a group called Outward Bound North Carolina some 34 years ago. I lost 30 pounds during that time and looked like a survivor of a Nazi death camp at the end.  I was young and dumb then.
    Now, I’m just old and dumb.

  • Earn it yourself, kid

    The way I see it, in many ways this country is headed down hill fast; it’s in high gear and nobody’s touching the brakes.

  • Tourism's economic impact

     

    Earlier this month, the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet released its annual report Economic Impact of Kentucky’s Travel and Tourism Industry. Tourism has long been an important job creator in Kentucky, and as the report revealed, those opportunities are growing across the state. Tourism-generated jobs provided more than $3.2 billion in wages to Kentucky workers in 2016—an increase of more than $156 million from 2015 wages.

  • The story of Ora Spalding

    Will Rogers said: “We can’t all be heroes. Some of us have to stand on the curb and clap as they go by.”
    You know it’s funny – some people who think they’re heroes aren’t and some who don’t consider themselves heroes really are.  

    I’ve been teaching a small Reserve Officer Candidate Course (ROTC) at Centre College for several years. I’ve brought in a lot of guest speakers, mostly veterans, who faced life-threatening situations and lived to tell about it.

  • Surveillance nation

    I’m 57 years old. When I was a kid I use to ask my parents, “What do we have now that you didn’t have when you were growing up?”

    The list was remarkably small. About the only thing they could think of was jets and televisions.

    If my kids asked me the same question today, I could give them dozens of items off the top of my head. Lots of the new stuff can be very helpful. For example, having a cell phone when your car breaks down on the highway. But other things have a real dark side.

  • What’s your excuse?

    George Washington Carver, the botanist and inventor—who as a black man in the Reconstruction era of nineteenth century America had reason upon reason for not succeeding—once observed, “Ninety-nine percent of failures come from people who have the habit of making excuses.”

    Carver made a conscious decision not to allow his disadvantages keep him from making positive contributions to life.

  • My farewell to Washington County

    I knew this day would come, but I admit, I didn’t think it would be so soon.

    This week’s publication will be my last as editor of The Springfield Sun, as I’ve accepted a position with the Kentucky Cabinet of Economic Development as a communications officer. I’ll start the new job on June 16 and I’ll be taking plenty of memories of Washington County with me.

    Starting with everyone at The Sun office; they’ve become a second family to me.

  • Our future, our hope

    I attended a Sunday service a few weeks ago at the Rockbridge Baptist Church out around Willisburg. The pastor, Terry McIlvoy, at one point made an appeal for donations to a local nonprofit called the House of Hope.

    Last Sunday, I was at the St. Rose Catholic Church and Father McGrath made an appeal for the House of Hope. In fact, several different churches, of different denominations, around the county have made appeals for money for the House of Hope.

    What is the House of Hope?

    What do they do?