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Columns

  • Becoming an effective leader

    By David Donathan

    Administrators often comment on what effective leaders they are, but true leaders do not reflect on the administrative acumen. This dichotomy is reflected in the difference between administrators and leaders. Administrators are process/policy focused whereas leaders are outcome focused. As long as an issue is being researched, studied, reviewed, revised, administrators are satisfied that progress is being made.  Leaders, on the other hand, understand that achievements, not intentions are of paramount import.

  • The warning label

    Years ago I when I was on active duty with the Army, I met a guy that had a poster in his office of a beautiful young woman in a bathing suit smiling back at you.

    I was a young fellow then and I have to admit I stood staring at it for a minute when the guy looked up and said “Read the warning label.”

    I didn’t see anything written on it and said “What warning label?”

    He then pointed down to a sentence so small that you literally had to use a magnifying glass to read it.

  • Is it ever going to end?

    I do not envy the Washington County School Board when it comes to making yet another decision regarding the opening of the new high school facility.

    I’ve followed the progress of the school closely and it’s been an ongoing story in The Sun for more than a year now. Even after everything that has happened — the delays, the vandalism, the disputes between all parties involved — it’s, at best, questionable whether the December move-in happens as scheduled.

  • Sure it’s time to celebrate?

    It’s one of the strangest football plays I’ve ever seen. The TV announcers were completely fooled, as was the entire Utah football team.  Unless you are a University of Oregon football fan, it’s painful to watch, and I would think even their fans feel a tinge of compassion for Kaelin Clay, the Utah wide receiver who prematurely celebrated what he thought was a touchdown.

  • The Jack Murphy story

    Writer’s note: My 16-year-old daughter, Jenny, gave the following speech for the Washington County High School Veterans Day program on Nov. 7. I’m reprinting it here with the dream that our politicians in Washington, D.C., would read it so they would come to know what selfless service for your country really is. If they were the kind of men that Mr. Murphy was, then our country wouldn’t have the problems we have today.

    Today we celebrate Veterans Day.

  • Saying goodbye

    Goodbyes can be frightening when they hold the possibility of prolonged separation and being forgotten.  You don’t have to be on your deathbed to feel that.

    I can see it already in my 2-year-old grandson, Eli Benson.

    I let him drive my car. Don’t worry, he doesn’t really drive. But don’t tell him, because he thinks he does. Eli meets me at the front door with determined eyes and declares, “Eli drive Poppop’s vroom vroom.”

  • A time for ghosts?

    There ain’t nothin like a good, old-fashioned scary show to get your neck hairs primed and standing up.

    When I was a little kid I was drawn to scary movies like a skunk is to tires rolling down the highway.

    That was a long time ago.

    It was different then.

    Now-a-days, kids have infinite sources of entertainment, whereas we had one. It was television, and we had only three channels.

    Good gosh, I shutter to think about it.

  • Little sparky comes to town

    If you really want to get noticed going around town then I’ve got some advice for you. Don’t buy a big tricked out SUV or one of those super fast sports cars, or even a great big pickup truck. Naw, that won’t get you any notice at all. Everybody has one of those.
    What you need is one of those new itty-bitty, teeny-weeny, micro-mini super compact economy cars.

  • The power of words

    Paula Deen was in the E!News studio recently, making media rounds to promote the launch of her new subscription-based online channel, the Paula Deen Network. It’s been over a year since her multi-million dollar culinary empire came tumbling down after her admission that she used a racial slur 30 years ago.

    “They (words) can be very powerful, and they can hurt, no matter how old they are,” Deen told E!News.

    When Today Show’s Matt Lauer asked her several weeks ago what she had learned from the experience, Deen immediately responded:

  • ‘Be not afraid’

    “Be not afraid”
    - God

    Be not afraid is the most quoted phrase in the Bible. It was used by God more often in speaking to his people than any other words that he had to say.

    Why did he have to tell us to not be afraid so often?

    He knew us so well, and this world is a scary place.