Today's Opinions

  • Weiner had to go

    It’s an irony of the modern age that the most devastating kind of sex scandal, at least for politicians, doesn’t involve actual sex. As Rep. Anthony Weiner has learned.
    Weiner, who resigned Thursday, assured his own demise years ago when he began sending raunchy pictures and sex-talk messages to random women over the Internet. He would have been better off if he had arranged to meet those women for secret trysts — not that there’s any indication that the women had the slightest interest in meeting Weiner for such purposes.

  • America's economic crisis

    Many Kentuckians are struggling in this economy, and I know they are frustrated by how hard it is just to stay above water. Home values are falling, automobile sales growth is at its lowest point this year, and manufacturing growth is at its lowest in nearly two years. One in ten Kentuckians are unemployed. And polls show most Americans remain pessimistic about a recovery.

  • Vacation without Cindy

    . . . is seldom a vacation.

    Cindy couldn’t go on our annual pilgrimage to Dollywood this year in Gatlinburg due to her new job.  I hated that, but she sure didn’t.
    For some reason the idea of missing out on walking all day in 95-degree heat with a pack of howling kids while going from ride-to-ride that astronauts would think twice about getting on didn’t seem to bother her.  I warned her how lonely it would be in the house all by herself for five days, and her smile just seemed to get bigger.
    Go figure.

  • Moving Mom and Dad

    As I walked away from the emergency room, I felt a heaviness for my friends who had just brought in their elderly father. They were rightly concerned about his health issues. But their dad wasn’t. In fact, he was angry that his adult children had insisted on admitting him to the hospital.
    There he rested on the gurney, pouting because he wasn’t home. His lower lip was turned up, childlike, which enhanced the scowl on his face as he weakly waved me away.
    It’s not easy parenting parents.

  • A great night at the ball park

    “When they start the game, they don’t yell, ‘work ball.’ They say, ‘play ball.’”
    Willie Stargell, 1981

    And play they did.
    “The Big Red Machine” rolled out to Idle Hour Park the other night for a softball battle with the mighty Braves. The Reds and the Braves are part of the 11-and-12-year-old girls’ softball league, and it was a heck of a game.
    The Reds were led by pitcher Elizabeth Medley, and the Braves by pitcher Anne Tayler Redmon.

  • Let's get ready for an electcion!

    I don’t want to alarm you or interrupt your daily Rep. Anthony Weiner twitter updates but while you were watching the jabs taken by the Democrats over Sarah Palin’s recount of Paul Revere’s famous ride and the Republicans rip Obama on any topic under the sun, we had a primary election in Kentucky.
    It’s been almost a month now that the election took place but I thought it was probably a good idea to mention it since only around 10 percent of the voters even bothered to head to the polls in May.

  • Les Miserables

    A soul for a piece of bread. Misery makes the offer; society accepts.
    Quote from Les Miserables

    I must sound like a broken record, but something really unique and breathtaking is happening down at the Opera House. I’m talking about the performances being put on by The Central Kentucky Community Theatre Group.

  • The Rapture Racket: Cashing in on the Apocalypse

    Oops, he missed it again — the date for the rapture, that is. But that’s OK. Miscalculating the date for the end times is nothing new for Harold Camping.
    In 1992 he published his book, “1994?” in which he predicted Sept. 6, 1994, as the beginning of the end.  Undeterred by that non-happening, Camping did some re-calculating and published another book in 2008, “We Are Almost There!” He conveniently forgot to mention his 1994 prediction’s failure to launch.