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Today's Opinions

  • Goodbye CATS, hello progress!

    CATS has breathed its last breath.

    After several attempts in recent years, Kentucky lawmakers have finally agreed on a plan to hammer the final nail in the CATS coffin.

    So, after 10 years of working toward the 2014 proficiency goal, we’re changing course. Sounds kinda discouraging, doesn’t it?

    But the fact is that stuffing CATS back in the bag could be the boost that education in Kentucky needs.

  • Semper Fidelis

    Semper Fidelis - Marine Corp motto in Latin meaning “Always Faithful.”

     

    A young Washington County man named Derek Bartley died last week in a tragic accident at home.  He was 23.

    You know death is so unnatural when it comes to a young person full of life.  Nobody wants to die, but there are no parents that want to bury their children.  I can only imagine the anguish of broken hearts for David and Laura.  It must be what hell is like.  

    I never met Derek, but I know he was a remarkable young man.  

  • During crisis, at least Obama remains calm

    Last fall, Barack Obama was deemed by all the great and good as the man to save the country from its financial crisis because of his calm. As John McCain flailed around, Obama stayed steady, and commentators ascribed to him the most extraordinary leadership qualities based merely on his equipoise.

    How is that working out? Well, the stock market has lost roughly 25 percent of its value in the past two months, destroying more than $2.6 trillion of wealth. But at least President Obama is calm.

  • From the ridiculous, to the stupid

    It always seems as if something breaks down or needs replacing whenever large bills are due.

    If it’s time to pay the homeowner’s insurance premium, then one of our vehicles needs new tires. If it’s time for property tax bills, then the hot water heater goes out. That’s just the way life is.

    Somehow, though, while there might not always be money for the things we want, there always seems to be enough for the things we need.

  • What can this economy teach us?

    Economists agree — banks have too much debt and we, dear Americans, also have too much individual debt.

    In 2008, 25 banks failed in the United States. In just two months this year, 16 banks have failed.

    I heard on National Public Radio last week that Americans now owe $13 trillion on mortgages and credit cards and that’s as much as the country’s GDP, or Gross Domestic Product.

    The GDP is a measurement of the output of goods and services in the country — a picture of the total U.S. economy.

  • Heart health is important all year long

    A killer once stalked me almost snuffing out my young life.

    The deadly force didn’t lurk around corners, sneaking quick peeks or huddle outside the shrubs in front of my house - watching, waiting.

    This frightening phantom was hiding inside my chest, little by little, growing over many years.

    It was coronary heart disease.

    The dreaded slayer takes more lives than any other disease in the U.S. and it had my number.

  • House painters

    My church believes, and probably many others, in a lot of counseling before a couple gets married.

    It’s a good idea.  

    It’s not really counseling.  It’s more like getting to intimately know the person you want to live with forever.  You get into all sorts of areas that never come up in normal dating.  You know, things like money, where are you going to live, how about kids, and so on.

    It’s a great idea.  

  • Donating my body to science, sort of

    A family history of heart disease? Who, me? Of course not.

    My grandfather has had some heart trouble, but he’s in his 80s now. Oh, and my dad and my uncle had some trouble, but they were both heavy smokers prior to their heart problems.

    OK, so I guess this is a “family history” of heart disease, but like most of people, I didn’t want to admit it.