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Opinion

  • A big step was taken last Thursday night by the Washington County school board members, and I feel it was a step in the right direction.

    Robin Cochran was hired as the new superintendent of schools, filling a position that was vacated when Rob Stafford resigned earlier this year. Stafford was hired at the start of last school year, and his tenure here was quite short, but understandably so. With some family concerns on his mind, Stafford left Washington County to be closer to home, his wife and two young children, and I don’t see how anyone can blame him for that.

  • “It doesn’t matter if you win or lose, it’s what you do with your dancin’ shoes.”

    Vince Fontaine from the movie “Grease”

  • “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” Then I said, “Here I am. Send me!”

    Isaiah 6:8

     

    Sometimes people pray, and sometimes the actions of a person is a prayer in itself.

     There’s an extremely interesting article in a Catholic newspaper called The Record out of Louisville on former resident Hugh Haydon, son of C.H. and Frances Haydon of Springfield.  Record Staff Writer Marnie McAllister wrote it, and you can read the article on the Internet at www.readthesun.com.

  • This letter is in response to Sr. Claire McGowan’s Column of Aug. 5.

    Dear Editor,

    Science uses data and analysis to determine how our natural world functions. Neither emotional arguments nor unsubstantiated claims comprise a scientific debate. Sr. McGowan’s column used talking points Al Gore and the extreme environmentalists have been using to scare people into funding their causes.

  • School has almost started, and it’s time for me to pass along some words of wisdom to these high school kids that they can use for the rest of their lives.   I don’t have much wisdom, so read closely.  

    First, I need to ask you a few questions.

    Who would you really like to hang with?  

  • Wild claims and plenty of scare tactics are emerging about the dangers of reforming national energy policy.  Cooler reasonable heads are essential as we examine our current situation.  We need a major new national energy policy for four reasons:

    • Energy independence.  Currently we are almost completely dependent on other countries for our national oil supply.  This is a source of danger on many levels, including the hope of eventually achieving world peace.

  • Dear Editor,

  •  Get ready to pay a whole lot more to keep the lights on.

     Congress currently is working to pass a huge energy bill. The centerpiece is a system to force energy utilities to purchase government credits to offset their greenhouse gas emissions. This would in effect be an energy tax on the American people as the utilities pass the increased costs along to consumers and small business owners.

  • If you have followed my column over the last few years, then you’re well aware that I may go from writing comic fantasy one week to being deadly serious the next.  My nature is to laugh at the world, but remember why we’re all here.

    Do you know what my favorite subject to write about is?  It’s about God and his messages to us in the Bible.  

    Strange, isn’t it?  A man like me probably knows more about the devil than God because of the way I’ve lived my life.   

  • I was listening to the news one morning last week and one of the topics was naturally the economy. The banks, the car manufacturers, mortgage companies, and then the words domestic violence came into play. Working with women who are going through domestic violence is my job, and naturally when I hear those words, my ears automatically perk up.

  • Dear Springfield and Washington County,

    When was the last time you were a part of something very special?

    When was the last time your heart strings were played upon so completely that you rediscovered your own personal music score? I speak not about how you sing in the shower; I speak of the music in your heart.

    Have you lost your inner person song? Have you stopped singing in your heart?

  • Excitement in a small town is where you find it.  Fortunately, it’s not too hard for someone like me who’s easily amused at even the most mundane things.  Take electronic devices, like cash registers and security systems in stores.  Nothing funny there, but I always seem to have trouble with them.

    Part of the reason is I never carry cash with me.  This is mainly because I don’t own any.  It’s been that way all my life.  

  • Larger than life.

    It’s a phrase you hear about famous people, whether they are actors, singers, athletes or anyone else we think of as a celebrity.

  • I was sitting in front of my computer writing this story when my seven-year-old, Belle, walked by.  

    “What’re you doing?” she asked.

    “Writing a story about you,”  I replied.

    “Don’t write about me.”

    “Can you read yet?”

    “Yes.”

    “O.K. I won’t write about you.”

    Now, where was I?  Oh yeah, I was writing this story about Belle.

  • If you haven’t visited the Louisville Slugger Museum in Louisville, then it’s well worth the trip.

    Saturday, my wife, son and I spent the afternoon perusing the museum, exhibits and factory where the baseball bats are made.

    As we toured the facility, I was struck by the diversity that the game of baseball represents.

  • Congressman Ben Chandler showed his true colors recently by voting for a massive special interests pork bill. The “cap-and-trade” bill barely passed the U.S. House (most of the moderate and conservative Democrats voted against it, along with nearly all the Republicans), and, according to the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), will cost the average Kentucky family nearly $200 more each year on their energy bills.

  • I’ve been reading a lot on the national debt of these here United States lately.

    I think the U.S. Government is going to spend some $1.8 trillion dollars more than it will take in this next year alone.

    Trillion?  Isn’t that a hard word to wrap your mind around?  

  • Dear Editor,

    Where is our responsibility to respect our American Flag?

    After Memorial Day weekend was over, and into the following week, I returned to the Willisburg community to get the American Flag I had taken down to my husband’s grave.

  • “Bless us, O Lord, and for these thy gifts which we are about to receive, from thy bounty, through Christ our Lord.  Amen.”

    Grace is such a simple prayer.  It’s a prayer of thanksgiving and a reminder that all we have comes from a loving God.  

    I had an uncle who died many years ago that never ate anything without saying Grace, and I mean nothing.  He seemed to take it to extremes.

  • As my colleagues and I began the second week of the 2009 Extraordinary Session, we were still uncertain as to if we would be able to accomplish our foremost mission, addressing our almost $1 billion budget shortfall. With the Senate approving one version of the budget and the House approving vastly a different one, many were unsure about the bill’s fate.  Yet, after only one day, the conference committee emerged from negotiations with two bills geared towards economic recovery and fiscal discipline.