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Opinion

  • Not every young man or woman is meant to go to college.  Some will struggle, for lack of interest, in even completing high school.  In fact, staying out of trouble may even be a major undertaking.  What do you do in a case like that?  

     Today’s story involves a young man named Matthew who took a different and unexpected path toward his life.  He left everything he knew and set out for the adventure of a lifetime at the age of 16.

  • Dear Editor,

    The annual spring roadside junk pickup in Washington County is a great benefit to area residents. Once a year we get a great opportunity to clean out barns, fields, garages and homes.  The county gets access to recyclable metals that can be sold to help recover collection costs.

  • I’m sometimes amazed at the actions of others.

    Even with all I’ve seen through my job, some things still catch me off guard and leave me scratching my head in bewilderment.

    I had one of those head-scratching moments this week after watching Cox’s Creek resident Mark Mudd on “American Idol.” The reality show held auditions in Louisville last fall and Mudd decided he would try to earn a spot on the show by singing George Jones’ “White Lightning.”

  • A real challenge and a lifesaving opportunity in our midst.

    Approximately every two seconds someone in America needs blood. Blood is needed every day for patients with blood disorders, those being treated for burns or undergoing chemotherapy, and premature babies, just to name a few. The need is constant.  

  • Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send?  Who will go for us?  “Here I am,” I said:  “Send me!”

    Isaiah Chapter 6: Verse 8

    Have no doubt.

    God is listening to you.

    He does answer prayer.  

    Most of the time he answers these prayers through people living around us.  They are the few that answer the call of the Lord when he asks, “Whom shall I send?”

  • For several years now, I’ve heard stats released at the start of a new year about how much time the American workforce wasted in the past year, and how that time was spent.

    Without fail, fantasy sports are credited, or blamed, depending on how you look at it, as being the largest waste of time in the average American’s work day. Anywhere from 30 minutes in some cases, to as many as two hours are spent on fantasy sports by some workers, and the employers are footing the bill while their productivity suffers.

  • Children nowadays are tyrants. They contradict their parents, gobble their food and tyrannize their teachers.

    Socrates, died 399 BC

    I’m philosophically opposed to engaging in debate with the younger generation when it comes to standards of morals and behavior.

    Does that make sense?

    No?

  • Thanks to the trust of the people of Kentucky, I’ve received the privilege of another term in the U.S. Senate. That’s an extraordinary gift from the voters, and I’m grateful to have the next six years to serve our Commonwealth and our country.

    As a new Congress and a new presidential administration begin, I look for lessons from great Kentuckians who have served our state in public office in the past. One who stands out is Wendell Ford.

  • To the Editor:

    I am writing to publicly recognize Kentucky legislators who supported Senate Bill 96 and House Bill 162 in the 2008 legislative session. These bills require insurance companies to provide a health benefit for colon cancer testing. Gov. Steve Beshear signed these bills into law on April 15, 2008, and they are effective Jan. 1, 2009. Requiring insurance companies to provide for colon cancer screening will go a long way in helping reduce the impact of colon cancer in our state.

  • Changes are coming to almost all businesses in today’s world, and the economy is behind many of those changes. We see people doing things differently in the way they provide services, and often, those changes are not for the better.

    In our business here at The Springfield Sun, we realize we are part of a very different industry these days than just a few years ago. In fact, things are changing by the minute in the newspaper business in our country and even around the world.

  • The River of Life Church, located on Highway 555 across from Idle Hour Park in Springfield, will be giving a free showing of the marriage-building movie “Fireproof Your Marriage.” It will be shown on Saturday, Jan. 10 at 7 p.m. at the church. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. and everyone in the community is invited. More information can be had at (859) 336-7604.

  • When you get married you become as one with your wife or husband. What you do affects him or her as surely as it affects you. You’re responsible to that person by a bond of love. That love demands you make every decision in your life centering on protecting that relationship.

    When you have children that bond and commitment multiplies.Major decisions you make at that point in your life can become complicated. It leads to conflict within you.

  • Motivational speaker’s visit was a success

    Dear Editor,

  • The Birth of Jesus

    1In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. 2(This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) 3And everyone went to his own town to register.

  • “The Lord is with you.”

    The Angel Gabriel speaking to Mary

    The quote you see above was said by the Angel Gabriel to Mary announcing the coming of Jesus Christ. Mary was about to conceive a child without ever knowing man. God knew, as good a woman as Mary was, she would still need his help, his divine protection, for the road that was ahead of her.

    Divine protection.

  • “Hey, buddy, how are you doing? I haven’t seen you in years!”

    We’ve all been there - you’re out in a store or restaurant, and suddenly you see someone you recognize, and they recognize you - but you just can’t remember their name. You try hard, but you can’t seem to come up with that name you once knew well, so you just call them “Buddy” or “Pal”, or some other vague name like that, trying to conceal your forgetfulness.

  • Last week I put together an article where local elementary school youngsters ages seven to 13 asked questions that I put to local oldsters in their 90s. It was the largest column I ever put together, but it could have been several times that size. I spent about five hours relaying questions from these two totally different generations.

    You know what?

    I found talking with Mr. Hugh L. Gundy, Mrs. Mary Ann Hardin, and Mrs. Sadie Kate Leachman very calming and reassuring in the distressing times we live in.

    Let me explain.

  • It never ceases to amaze me how impressed visitors to our county are with our community and the positive comments they make about our county. They speak of the beauty of our countryside, the obvious pride that our citizens take in their property, and the friendliness of the people they meet here.

    Why do these themes seem to be prevalent among those who don’t know us well?

  • To many people, it must have been a remarkable picture.

    After months of bitter campaigning, President-elect Barack Obama sat next to Sen. John McCain for a meeting a few days ago. They talked at length about how they could reach across party lines to discuss - and move forward on - some of the nation’s most challenging issues.

    If they can do this on a national level, why can’t we do it in Kentucky?

  • History can be read from a book, but there is nothing like learning real history, or lessons from life, from people who have lived it.

    The following article taps into 277 years of living from Washington County residents Mr. Hugh L. Grundy (age 92), Mrs. Sadie Kate Leachman (age 94), and Mrs. Mary Ann Hardin (91).

    The rest of this column comes from questions raised by Mrs. Heather Purdom’s North Washington Elementary School first graders and Mrs. Inez Grider’s eighth graders at St. Dominic Elementary School.