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Opinion

  • “The Lord is with you.”

    The Angel Gabriel speaking to Mary

    The quote you see above was said by the Angel Gabriel to Mary announcing the coming of Jesus Christ. Mary was about to conceive a child without ever knowing man. God knew, as good a woman as Mary was, she would still need his help, his divine protection, for the road that was ahead of her.

    Divine protection.

  • “Hey, buddy, how are you doing? I haven’t seen you in years!”

    We’ve all been there - you’re out in a store or restaurant, and suddenly you see someone you recognize, and they recognize you - but you just can’t remember their name. You try hard, but you can’t seem to come up with that name you once knew well, so you just call them “Buddy” or “Pal”, or some other vague name like that, trying to conceal your forgetfulness.

  • Last week I put together an article where local elementary school youngsters ages seven to 13 asked questions that I put to local oldsters in their 90s. It was the largest column I ever put together, but it could have been several times that size. I spent about five hours relaying questions from these two totally different generations.

    You know what?

    I found talking with Mr. Hugh L. Gundy, Mrs. Mary Ann Hardin, and Mrs. Sadie Kate Leachman very calming and reassuring in the distressing times we live in.

    Let me explain.

  • It never ceases to amaze me how impressed visitors to our county are with our community and the positive comments they make about our county. They speak of the beauty of our countryside, the obvious pride that our citizens take in their property, and the friendliness of the people they meet here.

    Why do these themes seem to be prevalent among those who don’t know us well?

  • To many people, it must have been a remarkable picture.

    After months of bitter campaigning, President-elect Barack Obama sat next to Sen. John McCain for a meeting a few days ago. They talked at length about how they could reach across party lines to discuss - and move forward on - some of the nation’s most challenging issues.

    If they can do this on a national level, why can’t we do it in Kentucky?

  • History can be read from a book, but there is nothing like learning real history, or lessons from life, from people who have lived it.

    The following article taps into 277 years of living from Washington County residents Mr. Hugh L. Grundy (age 92), Mrs. Sadie Kate Leachman (age 94), and Mrs. Mary Ann Hardin (91).

    The rest of this column comes from questions raised by Mrs. Heather Purdom’s North Washington Elementary School first graders and Mrs. Inez Grider’s eighth graders at St. Dominic Elementary School.

  • The recent passing of Mrs. Chris Sisk triggered 1950’s memories of the “Ben Franklin Five and Ten Cent” store on Springfield’s Main Street. The glass bins of candy filled with chocolate stars, corn candy, malt balls, and many other candies come to mind. Mrs. Sisk was the proprietor who was also a gifted whistler. She was often called upon to provide entertainment at local events.

  • “Shopping is a woman thing. It’s a contact sport like football. Women enjoy the scrimmage, the noisy crowds, the danger of being trampled to death, and the ecstasy of the purchase.”

    Erma Bombeck

    You want to live life on the edge? Then my suggestion is to go shopping on the day after Thanksgiving, infamously known as “Black Friday.”

  • “We cannot do great things on this Earth, only small things with great love.”

    Mother Teresa

    A community Thanksgiving dinner will be served at the St. Dominic Elementary School cafeteria on Thanksgiving Day at no charge from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. All ages, cultures, and religions are welcome. It’s meant for people who just want to share this blessed time with others.

  • I can’t remember the first time I heard the old saying “What goes around, comes around” but I’m pretty sure it was during a lesson by my grandmother about the virtues of being kind or staying out of trouble. It can really apply to many things, but have you ever thought about this phrase as it relates to our local economy?

  • Dear Editor,

    Washington County Middle School students will be initiating a project titled “Pay It Forward”.

  • I like to see a man proud of the place in which he lives. I like to see a man live so that his place will be proud of him.

    Abraham Lincoln

    One Iraqi war veteran, Phillip Campbell, told me that Washington County does more for veterans than any other community that he knows. The biggest celebration has been the one at Washington County High. My father, a World War II vet, attends every year and positively beams when he talks about it.

    Yet there are numerous other smaller events that don’t always receive mention.

  • Dear Editor,

    I have just sat down to read the paper and noticed an article on EMS. I must admit that I was hurt and angry. You see my husband, John White, was one of those people who had to be gotten up a total of six times. He had cancer and was so weak he could not even crawl, much less walk. You know this was a very painful and humiliating thing for both of us. This is not something you do just because you can. He was a proud man and did not want to lose his dignity, but he had no choice.

  • Dear Editor,

    Life says there is a season for everything, that given enough time most people, places and things will change, therefore I’m not easily moved these days. In fact, little surprises me, but when I read that Fredericktown Elementary School would be closing its doors, I admit I was saddened.

    Aware that FES was facing a potential closing, I remained optimistic about its future, and for the most part because that very rumor was circulating back some 30-plus years ago when I was a student at FES.

  • Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore, send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me: I lift my lamp beside the golden door.

    Emma Lazarus

    The above quote is inscribed on the Statue of Liberty. It’s not idealistic dribble. It’s a real world economic plan for success.

  • I have little sympathy for some victims of identity theft. Not all, because some people simply have their private information stolen, and there’s little or nothing they could do to prevent it. I’ve even had someone hack into my bank account on the Internet, so I know it can happen to anybody, no matter how careful you think you might be.

  • No matter how big and powerful government gets, and the many services it provides, it can never take the place of volunteers.

    Ronald Reagan

    Throughout my life, I’ve seen the difference that volunteering efforts can make in people’s lives.

    Jimmy Carter

  • Squished.

    Squeezed.

    Squashed.

    I experienced all three of the above sensations last week when I had my very first mammogram at Spring View Hospital. And let me just say that “squished” is probably the most accurate of the three words above. But, there was also some squeezing and squashing involved. In fact, there are many other descriptive words I could use to describe my mammogram experience but they probably aren’t appropriate for the newspaper. I’ll save those for “girl talk” with my female friends and colleagues.

  • Every now and then it’s good if the parents of young kids can get away together for a few hours. Sometimes you need to step away from being a daddy or momma and just be a husband and wife again. It kind of renews the romance.

    There is one important point to make here. Kids tend to suck all the money out of you, along with your lifeblood, so it’s best if these are cheap affairs.

    Being a thoughtful husband I decided to make this happen for Cindy the other day while Fall Break was in session.

  • With the election coming up next month, I don’t know a single person who isn’t excited about this.

    I teach a class called “Diversity in Society” at St. Catharine College. Somehow the class got on the topic of who would win the upcoming election. One student in the class asked me whether it made any difference in people’s lives who won. I answered “no”, but a better answer might have been “not very much” or “not as much as I would like”.