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Local News

  • Remembering J.S. Moran

    It’s been 30 years since The Springfield Sun’s editor emeritus, James Saunders Moran, passed away. He was 100 years old.

    The famous journalist was inducted into the University of Kentucky’s Journalism Hall of Fame in 1985 and was named the county’s outstanding citizen in 1965 by the chamber of commerce.

  • Newby overcomes racism with hard work

    Paul Newby was never one to sit around and do nothing. From an early age, he worked on the 62-acre family farm in Russell County. He was taught about how to run everything and all his family worked together. They grew crops on the farm and also kept a garden.

    “We were raised on the farm my father brought us up on,” Newby said. “And our mother showed us how to do everything correctly.”

    They never were rich, but they got along just fine because of hard work and determination.

  • Fiscal court looks to improve security

    Trent Taylor

    ttaylor@readthesun.coom

    The 1816 Courthouse, which is attached to the county clerk’s office, has no type of security for any of the employees that work there and is in need of a security upgrade.

    Washington County Fiscal Court discussed adding a security feature that the employees of the clerk’s office, or of the Judge-Executive’s office could use in the event of an unruly person.

  • Colder temps means more care for dogs in winter

    Nick Schrager

    editor@readthesun.com

    When it’s cold outside, folks bundle up, but may forget about their animal companions.

    According to Springfield veterinarian Dr. Laura Webb, household pets are usually safe from freezing conditions, but outdoor pets such as farm dogs, can sometimes be forgotten.

    When asked how she feels about the situation, Webb said she feels terrible for those pets.

    “I just want them to get warm and be in the house, or be in a barn or something,” she said.

  • Conquering racism with love

    Trent Taylor

    ttaylor@readthesun.com

    Dorothy Sleet, Anna Keenes, Tierra Hargis, and Harmony Hargis. Four generations of a family that has shown nothing but love to other people. The family is a combination of African Americans and Caucasians living together as a family. Dorothy Sleet, the oldest of the family (82), says they are all just a happy family.

    “All in all it is just one big happy family,” she said.

  • Braving the freezing temperatures

    Trent Taylor

    ttaylor@readthesun.com

    With this recent batch of cold weather last week, most people stayed indoors. Schools were cancelled, but a group of hardworking and dedicated individuals were still out every day to get the mail to the citizens of Washington County. Trae Purdom, postmaster of the Washington County post office, said ,“If the sun comes up, we are going to deliver mail in Springfield.”

    And deliver they did.

  • Smalley celebrates 36 years of coaching

    Trent Taylor

    ttaylor@readthesun.com

    Following Saturday’s game against Henry County, Washington County Schools, along with his wife, Shorty Lassiter, and a host of volunteers, surprised head boys basketball coach Bernard Smalley with a plaque presentation followed with a reception. The WCHS gym was packed with former players, coaches, family, and friends of Smalley.

    Smalley was extremely appreciative to see everyone.

  • Frye overcomes racial segregation, becomes educator

    Editor’s note: this story contains information about racial segregation that some may find offensive. This content doesn’t reflect the views of The Springfield Sun or the story’s writer.

    Nick Schrager

    editor@readthesun.com

    Washington County resident Isaac Frye III, 69, has seen a lot over the years. Through segregation, racism, and integration, Frye has overcome many obstacles life has thrown his way.

  • Community Action gives annual report to fiscal court

     

    Hal B. Goode, former Washington County magistrate, and current Executive Director for the Central Kentucky Community Action Council, gave their 2017-2018 annual report to the fiscal court on Jan. 24. Goode brought the annual report saying, “We want to make sure that we are accountable for every step that we make.”

  • Smith's bond to remain the same

    Matthew R. Smith, 37, who allegedly was planning a mass shooting when he was arrested outside of LB Manufacturing, was arraigned in court on Wednesday.

    Smith’s attorney, Jude Hagan, motioned for Judge Allan Bertram to reduce Smith’s bond during the arraignment.