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Local News

  • Spalding appointed Bishop of Nashville by Pope

    Father J. Mark Spalding was given an offer he couldn’t refuse – straight from the Vatican.

    Pope Francis has appointed Spalding, a Washington County native, as the Bishop of the Diocese of Nashville, Tennessee.

    The appointment came via a phone call from the nuncio in Washington D.C., Archbishop Christophe Pierre. He is a representative of the Pope to the United States.

    The call only lasted three minutes and Spalding said he went through a number of emotions after being appointed.

  • Toy and coat drive in Springfield

    For the past two years, Jessica Darland and Lilly Beals at Cash Express of Springfield have organized a clothing and toy drive to benefit families and children throughout Washington County. This year’s iteration of the drive will partner with Washington County Community Action (WCCA) and the Family Resource Centers in Washington County schools in order to make sure that donations are properly sorted and matched with families.

  • Film complex to be built in Springfield

    The film industry is coming back to Springfield, and this time it’s here to stay.

    According to Springfield tourism’s director, Stephanie McMillin, the Springfield Bonded Film Complex will begin operations in 2018.

    The project is a collaboration of the tourism department, city of Springfield, local businessman Tony Royalty, the Springfield-Washington County Economic Development Authority, and James Bond III, a filmmaker and media mogul.

  • Venue change sought in double-murder case

    There’s a lot that stands in the way between now and a trial date for the man charged with murdering two people in Washington County.

    Craig A. Pennington, 53, the man accused of murdering Robert Jones and Crystal Warner in July 2016, appeared in court for a pretrial conference Wednesday afternoon.

    As a cold November rain was falling outside, attorneys deliberated with circuit judge Allan Bertram on what has to be done to prepare for the potential 3- or 4-week trial.

  • Fiber optic talks continue with city

    Talks surrounding the possibility of bringing fiber-optic internet access to Washington County continued at last Tuesday’s city council meeting when John Selent, a lawyer with Dinsmore & Shohl, and Ryan Bell, a senior manager at Bluegrass Cellular, presented to the council.

  • Court discusses future industries

    Nick Schrager

    Editor

    Washington County is continuing to work its way toward getting more business in the community.

    According to Daniel Carney, director of the Springfield-Washington County Economic Development Authority, a glass manufacturer visited Springfield last month looking for a place to open a bottle plant for the spirit industry.

  • Honoring our vets

    Washington County High School has been honoring veterans for 26 years with their annual Veterans Day celebration.

  • Bridge work gets closer to completion

    Nick Schrager

    Editor

    The sharp, electric squeal of power tools filled the air as workers entered the last stages of construction at the Mt. Zion Bridge Thursday.

    For Arnold Graton, the contractor of the reconstruction, the bridge has come along a long way since the restoration began in 2016.

    “We feel pretty good about it,” he said as hammers cracked in the background. “I’m happy with the way it’s gone.”

  • Educators join pension reform discussion

    Emotions were high as representatives from the Washington County School District helped form a spear point against Gov. Matt Bevin’s proposed pension reform bill.

    Thirteen representatives from schools across the county traveled to Jessamine County Oct. 30 for a town hall meeting with representatives Kim King and Russ Meyer, along with Senator Tom Buford.

    Legislators were there to listen and respond to teachers’ concerns on the matter.

  • Kelly serves community long after military career ends

     

    After serving in the United States Army in three wars across nearly three decades, one Washington County veteran is still finding ways to give back to his local community.