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Local News

  • Hunt retires from 4-H after more than 34 years

    Washington County 4-H agent Roberta Hunt is calling it a career.

    Hunt retired from her position after more than 34 years. She started her career in September 1983. Prior to that, she worked as an agent for three years in Hickman County, near the Mississippi River.

    Washington County was a prime spot for the Montgomery County native.

    “It was an hour from Louisville, and hour from Lexington,” she said. “It was only an hour-and-a-half away from home.”

  • Willisburg bank robbed Friday

    A bank robbery occurred in Willisburg Friday, and police are still searching for the suspect.

    The Willisburg branch of Springfield State Bank was robbed just before 6 p.m. Friday evening.

    According to a press release from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, the department responded to the call at approximately 5:50 p.m.

  • Tourism tax used to benefit community

    Three percent.

    That’s what anyone in Springfield pays on top of their bill at restaurants, hotels and Air BnB homes.

    But where does that 3 percent go?

    It goes into tourism.

    According to Springfield Tourism Director Stephanie McMillin and tourism board chair Channing Nally, the tax, which was implemented in 2008, brings in approximately $140,000-$240,000 annually.

    The tourism board oversees the funds, and like any other entity, McMillin said they are audited every year.

  • WCPL hires new director

    Washington County has a new library director, and he’s bringing years of experience with him.

    Shaun Whiteaker, 46, started his new job last week, and said he’s looking forward to building upon the success of Washington County Public Library. Whiteaker, and his wife, Holly, have two children, Elijah and Jonah.

  • 'Ghost Out' brings realism to consequences of impared driving

    It sometimes takes more than statistics and charts to make people truly understand. For administrators at Washington County High School, communicating the dangers of impaired and distracted driving to their students required making an extra effort. The ‘Ghost Out’ program was developed by the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety to help students “experience the seriousness and finality…and understand the dreadful consequences resulting from impaired driving.”

  • Campbell living a life in show business

    Nick Schrager

    editor@thespringfieldsun.com

    Charlotte Campbell, a 2011 graduate of Washington County High School, has been living a dream – one that has taken her to New York City and beyond.

    Charlotte, the daughter of Philip and Erika Campbell, has made a living in show business, and is currently in Colorado co-costuming “Ragtime” and playing Evelyn Nesbit in the show, a showgirl and pop culture figure in 1906.

  • Learning valuable lessons

    How well do you know the constitution? I mean, really know it. Enough to sit in front of a panel of judges and explain how the values and principals embodied within it have shaped American institutions and practices throughout history?

    If you’re in need of a lifeline, your best bet may be Amy Thompson’s AP government class at Washington County High School.

  • Board abolishes job description amid deficit

    The Washington County Board of Education axed one job description, leaving its duties to be absorbed by others.
    The board voted unanimously to abolish the college and career ready position in the wake of a $400,000 budget deficit.
    “We have to live within that,” Superintendent Robin Cochran said. “I don’t have three people saying they’re interested in a tax increase, either…”
    Cochran said many districts have that position, and it’s needed, but the board needs to reduce expenditures.

  • Reladyne has oil spill in Springfield Thursday

    Reladyne, a lubricant and fuel distributor, spilled oil into the stream off Main Street last week.
    According to Ashley Rickman and Sean Largent of Reladyne, recycled oil spilled into the stream off Main Street near Bluegrass Dairy around noon Thursday, but the oil has been contained.
    Both said cleanup efforts are in the works, and there’s no danger to the public.
    “It’s been contained to a specific area,” Largent said. “And we have an environmental company on site cleaning it up right now.”

  • Fiscal Court: Landfill will need to close

    The Department of Environmental Protection and Waste Management sent a letter stating that the Washington County Landfill will need to close. The Department’s report last year found four violations at the county landfill, three of which were because of the lack of a certified landfill operator. The county was able to satisfy those demands, but an issue with the slope on the sides of the landfill means that a complete shutdown is necessary.