.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Jets Over Kentucky soars

    Air traffic at the Springfield-Lebanon airport is at an all-time high, but not in the way you might expect. The annual Jets Over Kentucky event held at the airport is in its 14th year and has seen massive growth from its modest beginnings.

    This year, over 150 pilots have set up camp at the airport. Some have come from across the United States and others from around the world.

  • Film festival held in Springfield over the weekend

    The Springfield Opera House was transformed into a movie theater over the weekend.

    Springfield hosted the Hollywood South Film Festival, which brought filmmakers from around the country – as well as Canada and Europe – in for what was the first of three film festivals planned for the area.

  • All-Stars in district tourney action

    11-year-olds win 8-0 over Boyle

    It was a baseball game, but it looked more like a game of catch between Lance Coulter and Dylan Mattingly.
    Coulter struck out 11 of the 12 outs in his four innings of work, as he continued to throw the ball past Boyle County batters, only to have Mattingly toss it back to him to do it all over again.
    Boyle County collected just one hit and one base on balls against Coulter and failed to score a run.

  • Out of the dark

    Washington County  High School baseball will step out of the (literal) dark ages next season, as the plans for new lights on the high school field were finally able to get underway.
    The lights at the Commander ball field had been in operation since Idle Hour Park first opened in 1976. Judy Spalding, the Director of Finance and Business for Washington County Schools, says that the school was first notified that the lights were experiencing problems in 2015.

  • World What?

    Nearly two weeks into the tournament, the group stage is coming to a close. Some teams have locked up spots in the next round, while others have already been mathematically eliminated. The opening round has been filled with drama and plenty of unpredictability, so let’s take a look at the biggest storylines so far.

    Giants fall

  • Budget cuts slow hiring process a extension office

    Though the county has a new extension office building, it’s missing two important people; a 4-H agent and agriculture agent.

    According to Horticulture Agent Dennis Morgeson, the University of Kentucky is holding approximately 70 positions due to budget cuts from the state.

    Morgeson said it’s important to note that when the state cuts from the university’s budget, “the university cuts the College of Ag, the College of Ag cuts extension, and extension has to hold on hiring agents to meet their budget.”

  • Staying safe in the heat

    Summer is in full swing, and it can be easy to forget to stay safe when you’re outdoors.

    According to Ashley Spalding, APRN, when it comes to looking for heat-related illness, folks need to watch out for fatigue, dizziness, elevated heart rate, nausea, vomiting and the feeling of passing out.

  • Summer feeding program keeps kids full in the summer

    Washington County Schools is making sure children get nutritious meals, even when school isn’t in session.

    According to Regina Hood, the school nutrition director, the Summer Feeding Program was first established as part of a larger pilot program in the 1960s, but became it’s own unique program in 1975.

    “SFSP provides an opportunity to continue a child’s physical and social development while providing nutritious meals during long vacation periods from school,” Hood said.

  • Fourth of July celebration is July 3

    Special to the Sun

    The city of Springfield has traditionally held its Independence Day Celebration on July 3 – giving residents ample opportunity to have a celebration here at home and then travel to other surrounding towns for another celebration on July 4.

  • Medley wins ag achievement award

    This year’s agricultural achievement award was presented to Richard Medley.

    Dale Medley, who presented the award, said Richard has been involved in agriculture his entire life.

    “From tractor being one of his first words to being in the backyard using his toy hay roller to roll up the freshly cut grass clippings to produce the hay for his toy house,” Dale said. “He loved to help granddad around the farm and assist him in running (cattle) through the chute to give them vaccinations and hay… as time progressed, so did he.”